Watch the Genée IBC Finals LIVE From Hong Kong This Weekend!

Photo by David Tett, Courtesy Genée 2018.

Looking to add a little bit of ballet to your weekend? We have good news: The 2018 Genée International Ballet Competition is streaming excerpts from their finals live this Sunday, August 12 from Hong Kong. Hosted by the Royal Academy of Dance, the Genée differs slightly from other ballet competitions in that it's exclusive to dancers training in the RAD syllabus. This year's 14 finalists were just announced this morning; the competitors were whittled down from 51 candidates from 13 nationalities. To watch this group of promising young dancers compete for gold, silver and bronze medals, as well as the Margot Fonteyn Audience Choice Award, go to the Genée Facebook page. The stream will also include exclusive interviews with members of the Genée team, the medalist announcement, and a special guest performance by Hong Kong Ballet. The stream begins at 7:25 pm Hong Kong Time—keep in mind that Hong Kong is 12 hours ahead of EST. You can track the time difference here.

Prep for the finals by watching this video of the finalists being announced earlier today, and scroll down for a full list of who to watch.


Genée 2018 Finalists:

  • Lily Carbone, 15, Australian, trained at Classical Coaching Australia
  • Breana Drummond, 17, New Zealander, trained at Tanya Pearson Academy
  • Caitlin Garlick, 15, Australian, trained at Karen Ireland Dance Centre
  • Monet Hewitt, 16, New Zealander, trained at Philippa Campbell School of Ballet
  • Sophie Higgins, 16, Canadian, trained at Pro Arte Centre
  • Chloe Jackson, 18, British, trained at Atelier Australia
  • Michaela Louw, 16, South African, trained at Carstens Ireland Ballet School
  • Lucy Malin, 18, British, trained at Ballet West
  • Soroya Nathasya Dwinandry, 17, Indonesian, trained at Namarina Dance Academy
  • Enoka Sato, 16, Japanese, trained at Annette Roselli Dance Academy
  • Lucinda Worthing-Shore, 15, Australian, trained at Tanya Pearson Classical Coaching
  • Jordan Yeuk Hay Chan, 16, British (Hong Kong), trained at Jean M. Wong School of Ballet
  • Joshua Green, 17, Australian, trained at Karen Ireland Dance Centre
  • Basil James, 16, British, trained at Faculty of Tring Park School
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