Gabriel Gaffney Smith with Caitlin Valentine in Edwaard Liang's Distant Cries

Jennifer Zmuda, Courtesy BalletMet

Gabriel Gaffney Smith Says Farewell to BalletMet for Careers in Visual Art and Music

In addition to cancelled shows, the coronavirus pandemic has disrupted final performances for many retiring dancers. Pointe is giving several retiring principals and soloists a chance to reflect on their careers and offer advice to the next generation.

For 35-year-old Gabriel Gaffney Smith, retiring from BalletMet is more about switching focus than a bona fide farewell to dance. A modern-day Renaissance man, Smith is also a choreographer, composer and visual artist. His road to being a dancer began at age 12 at New York's Saugerties Ballet Center. He then attended Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School before becoming a member of the main company in 2005.

In 2008, he joined BalletMet, where he has not only danced but has had opportunities to choreograph and compose music for the company. He has also collaborated with musicians and choreographers, composing works created for The Washington Ballet, Kansas City Ballet, Cincinnati Ballet and Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. As a visual artist, his woodcarvings have been shown at the Columbus Museum of Art and in galleries across the United States. (See samples of his artwork and music at GabrielGaffneySmith.com.) Smith, at home in Columbus, Ohio, with fiancée and fellow BalletMet dancer Carly Wheaton, reflected on his career and talked about why he's shifting his attention toward his other artistic loves.


Carly Wheaton and Gabriel Gaffney Smith, wearing knee-length black leggings and zip-up tops, face each other and lunge towards the audience. Wheaton looks into Smith's outstretched hand as a string quartet plays in the background.

Smith dancing alongside his fiancée, BalletMet dancer Carly Wheaton

Jennifer Zmuda, Courtesy BalletMet

When did you decide that you wanted to make dance a career?

A game-changer for me was attending Miami City Ballet's summer program as a young dancer. I was around amazing dancers at a high level that were training to be in ballet companies. There, I felt how incredible ballet was and how I could express myself in it.

What were some of the challenges you faced as a student?

There was a bit of bullying as a kid, but I never really let that bother me. For me the biggest challenge was starting a bit late, at 12, and trying to catch up. Those things were just fuel for my fire to prove I could make it.

What advice would you give young dance students looking to pursue a career like yours?

Work hard and be respectful to the people around you. Explore your physical body, such as your port de bras, along with movement outside of ballet. If you have an idea, just use your imagination and make it happen.

Why are you retiring now?

I had been thinking about this for a couple of years. For me, I really wanted to spend more time making visual art and music. I am not afraid to move on to the second act of my life.

What will you miss most about company life?

Going in every day and taking class, creating characters and the process of making dance. I will also miss the people and the friendships made in the studio.

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, you missed out on an onstage farewell. Have you looked into returning for a final onstage performance?

I am definitely interested in one and have been in conversation with artistic director Edwaard Liang. It would be pretty incredible if things worked out, but if not, that's just how the cookie crumbled for me.

One of Smith's abstract artworks, entitled Shark Girl.

Courtesy Gabriel Gaffney Smith.

You have choreographed and created music for several dance companies. How will that play a role in your career going forward?

I see myself creating multimedia events, like a gallery opening that incorporates dance and music, or dance films and music videos, along with choreographing and composing more for dance companies.

Has the pandemic sidelined or delayed any of your projects?

Yes and no. Right now, there are a lot of private collections I am creating artwork for. I also have things in the works for an art opening with music and more that will happen post-pandemic.

What else is in your plans going forward?

I want to ski. I was a major skier before I got seriously into ballet. I want to travel too. I also see myself doing small projects as a dancer.

Latest Posts


Paul Kolnik, Courtesy NYCB

NYCB's Maria Kowroski Reflects on the Challenges, Joys and Mysteries of Balanchine’s "Mozartiana"

The first time I was called to learn Mozartiana, I didn't think I would actually get to do it. It's a coveted ballerina role in the company, and I was still early in my career. But I got to dance it once or twice, and then not again for many years. The ballet isn't in our repertoire that often, so each time we've performed it I've been at a different level as a person and as an artist.

Keep reading SHOW LESS
Getty Images

Ask Amy: How Can I Overcome My Fear of Pirouettes on Pointe?

I have a terrible fear of falling when doing turns on pointe. I sometimes cry in class when we have to do new turns that I'm not used to. I can only do bad singles on a good day, while some of my classmates are doing doubles and triples. How can I get over this fear? —Gaby

Keep reading SHOW LESS
xmb photography, Courtesy The Washington Ballet

The Washington Ballet's Sarah Steele on Her At-Home Workouts

Ballet at home: Since she's not preparing for any immediate performances, Steele takes ballet barre three to four times a week. "I'm working in more of a maintenance mode," she says, prioritizing her ankles and the intrinsic muscles in her feet. "If you don't work those muscles, they disappear really quickly. I've been focusing on a baseline level of ballet muscle memory."

What she's always working on: Strengthening her glute-hamstring connection (the "under-butt" area), which provides stability for actions like repetitive relevés and power for jumps. Bridges are her go-to move for conditioning those muscles. "Those 'basic food group'–type exercises are some of the best ones," she says.

Keep reading SHOW LESS

Editors' Picks