Ballet Stars

As Colorado Ballet's Francisco Estevez Fights Leukemia, Denver's Dance Community Comes Together to Help

Colorado Ballet soloist Francisco Estevez. Photo by David Andrews, Courtesy Dancers for a Cure.

Francisco Estevez is only 29 years old, but he's battling cancer for the second time. In 2013, the Colorado Ballet soloist was diagnosed with testicular cancer, which was swiftly treated with surgery. But during a routine physical in April, doctors noticed that Estevez's white blood cell count was severely elevated. They concluded that he had chronic myeloid leukemia, a very rare form of blood cancer. "At first I thought, how can this be happening again?" says Estevez. "I've had a few moments of sadness, but I've tried to find the humor in it, which has helped. Thankfully my wife [Colorado Ballet soloist Tracy Jones] and I are fortunate to have a good support system here in Denver and around the world."

That support system is coming together in a big way this week. Roughly a dozen Colorado dance organizations are joining forces to participate in Dancers for a Cure, a benefit performance for Estevez on September 6 and 7 at the Lone Tree Arts Center. The concert was spearheaded by Alison Jaramillo, artistic director of Littleton Youth Ballet, where both Estevez and Jones have taught classes during their off-season. "She asked if we wanted to do a benefit performance to raise money for some of the medical costs, as well as future costs," says Estevez. "We didn't know how to feel about it initially—it's always awkward to accept help from those who aren't your family." They eventually agreed, with the condition that the concert also give back to the community somehow. Now, half of the proceeds will go towards the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.



Estevez (far right) in "Fancy Free." Photo courtesy Colorado Ballet.

Dancers for a Cure will feature area schools and companies like Colorado Ballet, Canyon Concert Ballet, Cleo Parker Robinson Dance and Zikr Dance Ensemble. But one performer on the program is particularly notable: Estevez himself. He'll perform two solos (from Amy Seiwert's It's Not a Cry and Ben Van Cauwenbergh's Le Bourgeois), and a special duet with one of his students."This form of leukemia is thankfully treatable through a targeted chemotherapy drug," he says, adding that the drug, Sprycel, does not have nearly the destructive side effects as traditional chemotherapy. While Estevez has experienced periodic migraines, dizziness and end-of-day fatigue, he's felt well enough to continue dancing. "Traditional chemotherapy would have taken me out of the profession completely," he says.

What's most remarkable is that Estevez is more focused on giving back than on feeling sorry for himself. He's asked those who can't make the performance but who still want to help to consider sponsoring him in the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society's Light the Night Walk. And he hopes that the benefit can become an annual event—but without himself at the center of it. "We thought it would be nice to choose a different cause each year," he says. "I think it's great when we rally around something that affects us personally, but going forward I'd love for the dance community to try to be more proactive about helping within society."

The Conversation
Ballet Stars
Maria Kowroski and Stella Abera. Via Instagram @stellaabreradetsky.

While both based in New York City, American Ballet Theatre and New York City Ballet are very different companies, from their touring schedules to their repertoire and training styles. Nevertheless, two principals—ABT's Stella Abrera and NYCB's Maria Kowroski—have sustained a long-lasting friendship "across the plaza" of Lincoln Center. Both Abrera and Kowroski entered their respective companies in the mid-1990s at age 17, and their careers have run side by side ever since.

Tonight, for the first time ever, these two primas, joined by their colleagues Isabella Boylston and Unity Phelan, will perform together in a new work by Gemma Bond titled Marie Thérèse, presented as part of the annual Dance Against Cancer benefit concert. We caught up with Abrera and Kowroski after a recent rehearsal with Bond to hear what it's like to finally dance together, how they've seen the ballet world change throughout the years, and what advice they'd give to their younger selves.

Keep reading... Show less
The Royal Ballet's Vadim Muntagirov and Marianela Nuñez in La Bayadère. Photo by Bill Cooper, Courtesy ROH.

Do you ever wish you could teleport to London and casually stroll into The Royal Opera House to see some of the world's best-loved ballets? Well, we have a solution for you: The Royal Ballet's 2018-19 cinema season.

Whether live or recorded, the seven ballet programs listed below, streaming now through next October, will deliver all of the magic that The Royal Ballet has to offer straight to your local movie theater. Can you smell the popcorn already?

Keep reading... Show less
Carlos Acosta in a still from Yuli. Photo by Denise Guerra, Courtesy Janet Stapleton

Since the project was first announced toward the end of 2017, we've been extremely curious about Yuli. The film, based on Carlos Acosta's memoir No Way Home, promised as much dancing as biography, with Acosta appearing as himself and dance sequences featuring his eponymous Cuba-based company Acosta Danza. Add in filmmaking power couple Icíar Bollaín (director) and Paul Laverty (screenwriter), and you have a recipe for a dance film unlike anything else we've seen recently.

Keep reading... Show less
News
Gabriel Figueredo in a variation from Raymonda. VAM Productions, Courtesy YAGP.

This week, over 1,000 young hopefuls gathered in New York City for the Youth America Grand Prix finals, giving them the chance to compete for scholarships and contracts to some of the world's top ballet schools and companies. Roughly 85 dancers made it to the final round at Lincoln Center's David H. Koch Theater on Wednesday. Today, the 20th anniversary of YAGP came to a close at the competition's awards ceremony. Read on to find out who won!

Keep reading... Show less