In a dream world we'd all be able to pop over to the Bolshoi to see the best of Russian ballet whenever we want. But because (unfortunately) that's not a possibility for most of us, the Bolshoi makes it easier by bringing their masterpieces to the silver screen. Now in its 8th year, the 2017-18 Bolshoi Ballet in Cinema season presents a wide range of classic story ballets restaged by some of today's most celebrated choreographers. Movie theaters nationwide will screen these ballets starting on October 22; you can find the closest cinema to your hometown here. So grab a ballet-loving friend and a bucket of popcorn and be sure to get your tickets soon—if these knockout trailers are any indication, tickets are bound to sell out fast.

First up is Le Corsaire. Reworked by Alexei Ratmansky (a theme of this year's selections) from Petipa's 19th century classic, this ballet is billed by the Bolshoi as one of their "most lavish productions." A full shipwreck on stage? Yeah, "lavish" seems about right.


November brings The Taming of the Shrew. Based on Shakespeare's rowdy comedy, this Jean-Christophe Maillot production is a Bolshoi exclusive. In the winter a slew of classics come to the stage: The Nutcracker followed by the Bolshoi's premiere of Ratmansky's Romeo and Juliet.

Ready to really plan ahead? In February you can look forward to the The Lady of the Camellias, based on Alexandre Dumas' novel and choreographed by John Neumeier. And in March, Ratmansky's revival of Vasily Vainonen's The Flames of Paris is coming to a theater near you. Come spring two famous story ballets will grace the screens: Giselle starring Svetlana Zakharova and Sergei Polunin, and the whimsical and humorous Coppélia.

If this season trailer is any indication of what's to come, it's sure to be a thrilling series. Stay tuned for more videos and casting updates over the next few months.

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