Editor's Letter: When the Going Gets Tough, Keep Going

Dance Theatre of Harlem member Lindsey Croop (photo by Nathan Sayers)

When it feels like the world is against you, it’s easy to consider giving up. But successful dancers know how to persevere and weigh their options when life doesn’t go their way. Our cover star Sarah Hay demonstrates these skills perfectly. Her training and early career were full of rejection, poor body image and the frustrating feeling that she was being held back. It took guts for her to leave her company before she had a contract somewhere else, but eventually she found a home—and a promotion—in Dresden. Now, she’s about to be famous, as the star of the Starz network’s new ballet drama “Flesh and Bone.” (Check out our behind-the-scenes photo essay on page 32.)

Another inspirational example is Jennie Somogyi. Though she was told she would never dance again on three separate occasions, she wasn’t about to give up so easily. In “True Grit,” the New York City Ballet principal opens up to Dance Magazine editor at large Wendy Perron about how a deep inner strength kept her going during long months of recovery.

The same perseverance and open mind can be useful throughout your training, as well. Take it from Nashville Ballet apprentice Kristin Young. She had her heart set on getting into Indiana University’s highly competitive ballet program. But when she didn’t, she quickly switched gears and enrolled at the University of Oklahoma—and is thriving because of it. If you’re about to apply to schools, be sure to read “Planning Plan B” for advice on making an audition strategy that covers all your bases. Then, turn to our “Higher Ed Guide” to learn more about 100 ballet-focused dance programs.

Dancers are remarkably tenacious. If you’re feeling discouraged, follow Hay, Somogyi and Young’s lead—you never know what opportunities are around the corner.

 

“I always imagined using my degree after dancing, but I’m learning I can grow both my interests. After I started sharing my ideas for DTH’s social media, they asked me to do some public relations for the company.”—Dance theatre of Harlem’s Lindsey Croop on her dual degree from Butler University

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