News

Directors' Exodus at Pennsylvania Ballet

Roy Kaiser directing a rehearsal of Balanchine's "Rubies," with PA Ballet's Amy Aldridge and Alexander Peters. Alexander Iziliaev, Courtesy PAB.

As Pennsylvania Ballet wrapped up its 50th anniversary season this spring, changes at the top signaled the end of an era. In May, longtime artistic director Roy Kaiser announced his resignation, and two weeks later, executive director Michael Scolamiero announced his departure for Miami City Ballet.

Kaiser, a former PA Ballet dancer, had led the company since 1995, hewing closely to the company's Balanchine roots. Though PA Ballet weathered some financial hard times, the company has taken significant steps forward. It now has a new $17.5 million home, and recently reopened its school. Despite these changes, problems have lingered. “We've had a rough several years," says Scolamiero. “We're struggling with flat subscriptions, and the individual-giving base has gone up and down."


Enter Michael Kaiser (no relation to Roy Kaiser), the former president of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, and founder of the DeVos Institute of Arts Management. Kaiser, who has been credited with helping turn around several high profile dance companies, including Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, guided the company in creating a five-year strategic plan, and will serve as an advisor to the committee searching for Roy Kaiser's replacement. “There's fidelity to the Balanchine background and repertory," Kaiser says. “But the company has not been simply a Balanchine company. There's real diversity to the work, and I think the search committee values that."

Kaiser is fostering new partnerships on the artistic side. These include the company appearing in Philadelphia's popular FringeArts festival in collaborations with the celebrated Curtis Institute of Music. It will allow the company to branch into new choreographic territory. “I think these initiatives will expose the company to a younger audience," he says.

The Conversation
News
Maria Kochetkova presents Catch Her If You Can at the Joyce Theater this week. Manfredi Gioacchini, Courtesy Joyce Theater.

Wonder what's going on in ballet this week? We've rounded up some highlights.

Keep reading... Show less
The Royal Ballet's Vadim Muntagirov and Marianela Nuñez in La Bayadère. Photo by Bill Cooper, Courtesy ROH.

Do you ever wish you could teleport to London and casually stroll into The Royal Opera House to see some of the world's best-loved ballets? Well, we have a solution for you: The Royal Ballet's 2018-19 cinema season.

Whether live or recorded, the seven ballet programs listed below, streaming now through next October, will deliver all of the magic that The Royal Ballet has to offer straight to your local movie theater. Can you smell the popcorn already?

Keep reading... Show less
Ballet Stars
Quinn Wharton

Candy Tong is Complexions Contemporary Ballet's resident fashionista. "I'm known in this company for bringing too big of a suitcase," she says. Tong shares her style tips (and life on the road with Complexions) on her vlog, Candy Coated, and notes that her style is always changing. "I like to switch up my look depending on my mood or where I'm going to be or what city I'm in."

Keep reading... Show less
Site Network
Maria Kochetkova in Wayne McGregor's Chroma. Erik Tomasson, Courtesy Joyce Theater.

Maria Kochetkova's first season as a freelancer has been a whirlwind! A year after leaving San Francisco Ballet, she's already guested in Oslo, Berlin and London. Now, she's got something exciting in the works: From July 16-20, New York City's Joyce Theater will present her first solo program, Maria Kochetkova: Catch Her If You Can. Mounting such a production took a lot of time, self-development and courage, she says—but she's up for the challenge. Between rehearsals in Berlin, Kochetkova talked to Pointe about her favorite moments from the past year, her plans for the Joyce performances, and the ups and downs of life as a rogue ballerina.

Keep reading... Show less