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BalletMet Member Kerri Riccardi's Stuffed Peppers Recipe

After a challenging day in the studio, how do you refuel? BalletMet's Kerri Riccardi cooks up some stuffed peppers. Her recipe's filled with a nutritious mix of veggies and protein.


Ingredients:
4 bell peppers of any color
½ cup brown rice
3 hot Italian sausages, casings removed
1 tablespoon of olive oil
1 cup diced onion
1 cup diced zucchini
1 cup diced yellow squash
1 cup sliced mushrooms
1 (14.5 oz) can diced tomatoes
½ teaspoon oregano
½ teaspoon parsley
½ teaspoon basil
¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes
salt and pepper to taste
1/3 cup of pasta sauce
2-3 tablespoons of goat cheese

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F
2. Cut peppers in half lengthwise and remove all seeds and ribs. Set aside in baking dish.
3. Cook brown rice
4. Coat large pan with 1 tablespoon of olive oil over medium-high heat. Cook chopped onion and garlic. Add and crumble sausage and cook until brown. Stir in zucchini, yellow squash and mushrooms and cook until tender, then add diced tomatoes and oregano, salt and pepper. Add rice, tomato sauce and 1 tablespoon of goat cheese and mix well.
5. Fill pepper halves with meat and rice mixture and top with about 1 teaspoon of goat cheese on each pepper. Bake at 350 degrees for 30-35 minutes until peppers are tender.

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