Harkness Promise Awardees Raja Feather Kelly and Ephrat Asherie. Photos by Kate Shot Me and Matthew Murphy

This Year's Dance Magazine Awards Takes a Major Step Forward

The Dance Magazine Awards are almost here. As we look forward to the celebration on Monday night, we're sharing an excerpt from the program—a letter written by our CEO Frederic Seegal:

The 61st year of the Dance Magazine Awards represents a major step forward. It extends the reach of the awards and now marks the second year of our collaboration with the Harkness Foundation for Dance, thus uniting two iconic organizations.

Firstly, this will be the inaugural presentation of the Harkness Promise Awards, which recognizes new talent at the upswing of their careers. Nurturing emerging artists, especially choreographers, is critical to ensuring dance's role in today's cultural landscape.


Secondly, through the establishment of the Leadership Award, we acknowledge the extraordinary contributions of individuals who have enabled dance to flourish as a result of their efforts, whether they are presenters, producers, impresarios or funders. Without them, neither dancers nor choreographers would likely have a place to practice and excel at their craft.

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