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Ask Amy: Is Working Out in a Pool a Good Way to Cross-Train?

This story originally appeared in the August/September 2015 issue of Pointe.

Is working out in a pool a good way to cross-train? If so, can you describe some of the strengthening exercises that dancers can do in the water? —Karen


If you're looking for a cardiovascular workout, swimming laps can be a great option. It shouldn't be your primary source of cardio exercise though, says Michael Velsmid, DPT, MS and owner of Boston Sports Medicine, a clinic that provides aquatic therapy to Boston Ballet dancers. "The dancer's body needs to have a certain amount of stress imparted on it," he says. "But if you're recovering from a heavy workout, the pool is great. Where you might typically want to skip a day to rest and recover, you can go in the pool without any additional delay in your recovery."

The pool is also an excellent environment to rehabilitate, especially if you have difficulty with weight-bearing exercises like relevé and petit allégro. I spent an entire summer doing aquatic therapy when I was recovering from a stress fracture in my ankle. But according to Velsmid, "If you're not recovering from an injury, the pool probably isn't the best place to strengthen because it's a gravity-minimized environment."

However, simply taking barre underwater can do wonders to improve your alignment and balance. Suddenly, exercises that are simple on land, such as passé or grand rond de jambe, become much more difficult. "It helps create a better mind-body connection of how to activate those muscles," says Velsmid. If you have access to a pool, try going through a ballet barre using the ledge or wall to balance. For an even greater challenge, try it without holding on.

Have a question? Click here to send it to Pointe editor and former dancer Amy Brandt.

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