Courtney Lavine is the Face of Avon's New Fragrance

We love it when the rest of the world gets inspired by ballet—especially when they recognize dancers as the powerful athletes and intelligent artists that we know they are. Through collaborations like Misty Copeland's recent commercial for Dannon's Oikos Greek yogurt and New York City Ballet's new partnership with PUMA, ballet dancers are popping up in places that might have seemed unconventional a few years ago.

Photo by Rob Loud, courtesy Avon (via allure.com)

Now, American Ballet Theatre corps member Courtney Lavine is the face of Avon's new fragrance, set to be released this November. The scent, called "Prima," is floral with notes of plum, and according to the brand, it "celebrates female strength and resilience, as inspired by the grace and beauty of a ballet dancer."


In the past few years, Lavine has become a dancer to watch at ABT: After training at the School of American Ballet, she joined ABT's Studio Company in 2008, became an apprentice in 2010 and joined the corps only a few months later. In an interview with Allure last week, she opened up about working with Avon, the ABT dancers she looked up to as a student and her experience as a woman of color in the ballet world. "I was a go-getter as a kid, so I wasn't going to let the fact that I didn't see that many people who looked like me in ballet stop me from being a dancer, but it would have made things a little easier," she told them. “I would have had a little less doubt or worry growing up if I had seen more females of color around me."

As the face of a major campaign like this one, Lavine now has the chance to be an inspiration for other young dancers. And a fragrance that celebrates both the beauty and strength of ballet sounds like something we want in our dance bags.

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