Health & Body
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Used as a dietary supplement for centuries, honey is more than just a sweet treat. Among its natural health benefits are anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and it can even fight bacteria. If you need a pick-me-up during a long day in the studio, add a spoonful of raw honey to your afternoon snack. (It's minimally processed and is more nutritious than regular honey.) Try mixing it into plain yogurt or drizzling it over fruit—the natural sugars will give you a quick energy boost. Read on to see what else honey can do.

Heal Wounds

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Honey's antibacterial properties allow it to soothe minor burns and treat skin wounds—yes, that includes marley floor burns. When applying to wounds, use manuka honey, a special variety derived from the manuka bush's nectar

Ballet Training
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Struggling to remember all your choreography? Thankfully, just as there are ways to improve your stage presence and technique, you can improve your memory.

One proven strategy is the method of loci, an ancient mnemonic technique used by Greek and Roman orators and still practiced today. Also known as the memory palace, it involves memorizing a list of words by visualizing yourself walking around a familiar setting (such as your home) and placing a mental image representing each word in a specific spot.

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Monthly periods can be a huge hassle for anyone. But donning a leotard and tights or getting through a tough barre when you're having your period can make it even harder to deal with. Dr. Lauren Streicher, clinical associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University, offers these tips for bunheads to ease pain and symptoms.

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Ballet Training
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Results of a recent study published in the journal Psychological Bulletin found that millennials are the generation most predisposed to perfectionism. Factor in a serious study of ballet—constantly critiquing your movements in the mirror and dealing with strict instructors and talented competition—and you've only upped the ante.

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Health & Body
Photo by Trust "Tru" Katsande/Unsplash

Most commonly consumed as a powdery spice, turmeric has seen a recent spike in popularity but has been used in Indian and other Asian cuisines and natural medicine for centuries. Today, it's often consumed as a natural anti-inflammatory and a dietary supplement for a variety of medical conditions. Comparable to ginger, turmeric tastes warm and peppery. (It has a slight kick, so a little goes a long way.)

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Health & Body
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With endless hours of rehearsals and classes, your ballet career can leave you feeling exhausted. But what if your eating habits are only making it worse?

According to Rachel Fine, registered dietitian and owner of To The Pointe Nutrition, there are three major macronutrients (or "macros") that dancers need to consume daily to fuel peak performance: complex carbohydrates, protein and healthy fats. Since dancers require more energy than the average person, aim to include all three in every meal and snack. Fine suggests these combos:

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Health & Body
Follow these steps for relief from tension headaches. Photo by Thinkstock.

Tension headaches are often experienced by those in high-stress careers (ahem, dancers). Here's how to identify them and what to do when they strike.

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"Confetti" by Margot Hallac, of dancer Misa Kuranaga. Used with permission by Hallac, via Instagram

Growing up in Hong Kong, Margot Hallac always knew she had a knack for the arts. After training in ballet as a child and teen, she eventually found herself focusing on visual arts and moved to New York City to study at the Parsons School of Design. Now a graphic designer, she's since resumed her dance training—and is melding her talents together.

Outside of her day job, Hallac started creating her own artwork and noticed that the subject matter was gravitating towards ballet. Shortly after, Pointebrush was born. Not only does she frequently share her work on the site and its wildly popular Instagram account (with over 15,000 followers), she also sells her unique designs on phone cases, mugs, t-shirts, and as framed prints. We caught up with Hallac to hear more about her stunning ballerina art and where she draws inspiration for her work.



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