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Rainbow Bobby Pins Are Our New Favorite Way to Accessorize a Ballet Bun

NYCB's Unity Phelan and Miriam Miller accessorize with colored bobby pins while modeling for Côté Cour. Photo by Erin Baiano, @erinbaiano.

Bored with your daily ballet bun? We found the easiest way to amp up your studio look, courtesy of luxe leotard line Côté Cour. At a recent photo shoot for the brand's newest designs, we noticed that New York City Ballet dancers (and Côté Cour models) Miriam Miler and Unity Phelan added a touch of color to their slicked-back buns with their bobby pins.

Photo by Erin Baiano, @erinbaiano; courtesy of Côté Cour, @cote_cour.


Dreamt up by New York City-based hairstylist Daniela Schult, we love the idea of switching out neutral bobby pins for colored options. Not only is it super easy (especially if braided or twisted updos aren't your forte), but it also gives you endless styling possibilities—you can mix and match the pin colors to your leotards, and you can even play with designs like Schult's art deco-inspired bobby pins.

To copy the style for your next class, we've rounded up some of our favorite colorful picks.

Scünci Everyday & Active No-Slip Grip Bobby Pins

via Target

Scünci paired our go-to black bobby pins with four other bold colors in this pack of 45.
$3.99, target.com

Etsy Pastel Yellow Bobby Pins

via Etsy

If you want to match Miller exactly, Buy Brittique on Etsy has the perfect buttercup yellow pins. They also make other solid color options (we like the lavender), and even a glitter rainbow design!
$2.79, etsy.com

Kitsch Metallic Matchbook Bobby Pins

via Kitsch

For a subtler take, try this on-trend set of metallics, which includes silver, rose gold and gold colors.
$12, mykitsch.com

Redken Shine Flash Glistening Mist

via Redken

To give hair a glossy look, Schult used a finishing spray like this, which adds lightweight hold and shine.
$19.50, ulta.com

Summer Intensive Survival
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There's a sweet spot toward the end of August—after summer intensives have wrapped up and before it's time to head back to school or work—where the days are long, lazy and begging to be spent neck-deep in a pile of good books. Whether you're looking for inspiration for the upcoming season or trying to brush up on your dance history, you can never go wrong with an excellent book on ballet. We've gathered eight titles (all available at common booksellers like Amazon and Barnes and Noble) guaranteed to give you a deeper understanding of the art form, to add to your end-of-summer reading list.

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James Yoichi Moore and Noelani Pantastico warm up onstage. Angela Sterling, Courtesy SDC.

On a sunny July weekend, hundreds of Seattle-area dance fans converged on tiny Vashon Island, a bucolic enclave in Puget Sound about 20 miles from the city. They made the ferry trek to attend the debut performance of the fledgling Seattle Dance Collective.

SDC is not a run-of-the-mill contemporary dance company; it's the brainchild of two of Pacific Northwest Ballet's most respected principal dancers: James Yoichi Moore and Noelani Pantastico. The duo wanted to create a nimble organization to feature dancers and choreographers they felt needed more exposure in the Pacific Northwest.

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Roman Mejia in Robbins' Dances at a Gathering. Erin Baiano, Courtesy NYCB.

The Princess Grace Foundation has just announced its 2019 class, and we're thrilled that two ballet dancers—New York City Ballet's Roman Mejia and BalletX's Stanley Glover—are included among the list of über-talented actors, filmmakers, playwrights, dancers and choreographers.

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The Royal Ballet's Alexander Campbell and Yasmine Naghdi in Ashton's The Two Pigeons. Tristram Kenton, Courtesy ROH.

While most ballet casts are 100 percent human, it's not unheard of for live animals to appear onstage, providing everything from stage dressing to supporting roles. Michael Messerer's production of Don Quixote features a horse and a donkey; American Ballet Theatre's Giselle calls for two Russian wolfhounds; and Sir Frederick Ashton's La Fille Mal Gardee requires a white Shetland pony. Another Ashton masterpiece, The Two Pigeons, is well known for its animal actors. But though ballet is a highly disciplined, carefully choreographed art form, some performers are naturally more prone to flights of fancy—because they're birds.

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