To College or Not to College? Upcoming Fairs Might Have the Answer

Wendy Whelan teaching master class at The Hartt School, University of Hartford.

Is college in your future? Planning to dance when you get there? If the answer is yes—or if you’re agonizing over these very questions and want more information before making the decision—you need to check out these upcoming college dance fairs.

Só Dança College Dance Fair

September 2−4, Boca Raton, Florida

Butler University, New York University Tisch School of the Arts, Point Park University and the University of Arizona are just some of the colleges participating in this year’s South Florida College Dance Fair, presented by Só Dança. Rising juniors and seniors, and their parents, can look forward to a weekend jam-packed with master classes and information sessions to help you get your questions answered and a feel for college dance programs.

The event will be held at Boca Ballet Theatre in Boca Raton, Florida, September 2−4. Registration is required and cost of attendance is $169. Visit event website here.

 

Dancer in a USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance master class. Photo by Carolyn DiLoreto via USC Kaufman.

Dancing Through College and Beyond

October 22, New York City

The Dancing Through College and Beyond Festival in New York City is an invaluable networking opportunity for high school students. Meet faculty, students and alumni of college dance programs; take movement classes and even attend in-person auditions. Though the lineup of participating schools isn’t yet announced, last year’s fair hosted nearly 50 colleges, including Cornish College of the Arts; Purchase College, State University of New York; University of Hartford, The Hartt School; University of Southern California, Glorya Kaufman School of Dance; and many more.

The fair takes place Saturday, October 22 at the 92nd Street Y in New York City, with an evening reception and performance on Friday, October 21. Preregistration is required. Visit here for more details.

 

CNADM Fall Dance College and Career Fair

November 4−5, Oak Brook, Illinois

This Midwest fair, presented by the Chicago National Association of Dance Masters, isn’t just for prospective college students. In addition to universities and conservatories, attendees will have the chance to meet representatives from professional programs, talent agencies and other dance industry businesses. The two-day event will include Q&A panel discussions, classes and audition workshops. Find out about the college admissions process, scholarships and financial aid, planning college visits, and more.

The fair takes place November 4−5 in Oak Brook, Illinois. There’s no registration or cost required to enter the exhibit area, but workshop participation requires registration and a fee. Find out more and register here.

Unable to travel to one of these fairs?

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