Quinn Wharton

Complexions' Resident Fashionista Candy Tong Sports Swimwear in the Studio and Heels on the Street

Candy Tong is Complexions Contemporary Ballet's resident fashionista. "I'm known in this company for bringing too big of a suitcase," she says. Tong shares her style tips (and life on the road with Complexions) on her vlog, Candy Coated, and notes that her style is always changing. "I like to switch up my look depending on my mood or where I'm going to be or what city I'm in."


No matter the outfit, Tong has plenty of shoes to choose from. "Back home in California, I have a closet in my room and one in my garage just for my shoes," she says. "I love anything with a heel because it makes me feel like a girl boss."

In the studio, Tong rarely wears warm-ups, but she doesn't let leotards limit her. "I like to wear swimwear because those designs are usually cooler," Tong says. She completes her look with hair and makeup. "I feel like it transforms you," she says. "I can't live without my Anastasia Beverly Hills eyebrow pencil, and I love the Charlotte Tilbury Wonderglow for a nice glow on the high points of my face."

The Details — Street

Quinn Wharton

Zara top: "I love outfits that can go from day to night, like this bralette and mesh-top combo."

Aqua jacket: "I love the suede and faux detailing—I think it's the perfect transition from winter to spring and even early summer."

Zara pants: "I really enjoy pants with a fun pattern or bright color."

Jeffrey Campbell shoes: "This is my favorite shoe designer," Tong says.

Gucci Dionysus handbag: "I love that the crystal-embellished tiger head is flashy but not too flashy."

The Details — Studio

Quinn Wharton

Custom leotard: Tong's leo was created by Complexions costume designer Christine Darch. "I love a halter neckline," says Tong, "and the high cut with mesh at the hipbone makes my legs look longer."

Freed of London pointe shoes: "I get my shoes triple-shanked with extra glue," Tong says, adding that she does a lot of prep work to get her shoes just right. "I three-quarter my shank, Jet-glue everything, and take out the paper on the inside sole and add patterned duct tape instead because it holds up better. I also darn my shoes and pancake them with the cheapest foundation I can find to match my skin color."

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