Biscuit Ballerina's unmatched elegance captured alongside greyhound Willow. Courtesy Dancers & Dogs.

Biscuit Ballerina Teamed Up With Dancers & Dogs for the Greatest Photo Shoot of All Time

With their idea of pairing professional ballerinas and super-sweet pups, we didn't think it was possible for Dancers & Dogs to get any better. But boy were we wrong. For their latest collaboration, husband-and-wife photography team Kelly Pratt Kreidich and Ian Kreidich brought out the big biscuits (literally) by shooting Biscuit Ballerina with greyhounds Willow and Ziva—because it takes two greyhounds to try to match BB's grace, obviously.

Biscuit Ballerina strikes a pose with retired race dog and rescue, Ziva.Courtesy Dancers & Dogs.


And while it goes without saying that the finished photos are Instagram-worthy, it's actually the behind-the-scenes video that we can't stop laughing at. In it, Biscuit Ballerina shows us a proper pre-shoot warm-up, and Kreidich confirms that it's basically impossible to take a bad pic of BB (some dancers have all the luck).

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