Oh, socks: What are we gonna do with you? Many dancers—ourselves definitely included—have a love-hate relationship with this unassuming member of the footwear family. On the one hand, they feel oh-so-essential for pulling off endless turns in contemporary class. On the other hand, we've heard our fair share of horror stories from fellow dancers of catastrophic slips that led directly to serious injuries. Then what's a dancer to do? We're so glad you asked.

Below are five of our favorite dancer socks that won't let you down (literally or figuratively).


Behold, comp kid Carter Williams rocking Apolla Performance's Infinite Shocks. Apolla Shocks come with traction that starts out feeling sticky but can be "broken in" to your desired level of slip versus grip.


For all the minimalists out there, ToeSox's Relevé Half Toe makes effortless turns, well, effortless—all powered by organic cotton and minimal fuss.

Don't let the humble appearance of Capezio Extends fool you. These machine-washable bad boys boast a polyurethane outsole that works on a variety of surfaces, while the stretch nylon/spandex fabrication miraculously maintains that elusive barefoot feeling.

Discount Dance Supply's Natalie padded turn socks in Cherry (via discountdance.com)

Headed to a convention weekend? You'll want to pack the Natalie padded turn socks from Discount Dance Supply. Their cushioned ball of the foot is the answer to the prayer of dancers faced with carpet's unforgiving nature as a dance surface.

Valentine Pajtler, a dancer and business student in southern France, is the perfect model for Repetto's anti-slippery socks. They're clutch for warming up and doing floor barre.

The Conversation
News
American Ballet Theatre Studio Company in Lauren Lovette's Le Jeune. Erin Baiano, Courtesy The Joyce Theater.

Wonder what's going on in ballet this week? We've rounded up some highlights.

Keep reading... Show less
The Royal Ballet's Vadim Muntagirov and Marianela Nuñez in La Bayadère. Photo by Bill Cooper, Courtesy ROH.

Do you ever wish you could teleport to London and casually stroll into The Royal Opera House to see some of the world's best-loved ballets? Well, we have a solution for you: The Royal Ballet's 2018-19 cinema season.

Whether live or recorded, the seven ballet programs listed below, streaming now through next October, will deliver all of the magic that The Royal Ballet has to offer straight to your local movie theater. Can you smell the popcorn already?

Keep reading... Show less
Ballet Stars
Maria Kowroski and Stella Abera. Via Instagram @stellaabreradetsky.

While both based in New York City, American Ballet Theatre and New York City Ballet are very different companies, from their touring schedules to their repertoire and training styles. Nevertheless, two principals—ABT's Stella Abrera and NYCB's Maria Kowroski—have sustained a long-lasting friendship "across the plaza" of Lincoln Center. Both Abrera and Kowroski entered their respective companies in the mid-1990s at age 17, and their careers have run side by side ever since.

Tonight, for the first time ever, these two primas, joined by their colleagues Isabella Boylston and Unity Phelan, will perform together in a new work by Gemma Bond titled Marie Thérèse, presented as part of the annual Dance Against Cancer benefit concert. We caught up with Abrera and Kowroski after a recent rehearsal with Bond to hear what it's like to finally dance together, how they've seen the ballet world change throughout the years, and what advice they'd give to their younger selves.

Keep reading... Show less
Carlos Acosta in a still from Yuli. Photo by Denise Guerra, Courtesy Janet Stapleton

Since the project was first announced toward the end of 2017, we've been extremely curious about Yuli. The film, based on Carlos Acosta's memoir No Way Home, promised as much dancing as biography, with Acosta appearing as himself and dance sequences featuring his eponymous Cuba-based company Acosta Danza. Add in filmmaking power couple Icíar Bollaín (director) and Paul Laverty (screenwriter), and you have a recipe for a dance film unlike anything else we've seen recently.

Keep reading... Show less