Haven’t nailed down any summer plans yet? There’s still time to apply to the Royal Academy of Dance’s two-week Performance Course, new to the United States this year. Instead of focusing on technique, the spotlight in this intensive shifts to choreography, with a number of dance professionals setting original work on the students. After a morning class, dancers spend their days learning everything from modern to musical theater pieces, which they then perform at the end of the workshop. Dancers learn how it feels to be part of the creative process and they develop their performance skills.

 

The program has been hugely popular at the organization’s London headquarters for a number of years, so the directors decided to bring it to California State University, Long Beach studios this year. It’s open to dancers ages 12 through 22 who have at least 5 years of training. Classes are split up into three levels of no more than 25 dancers each. To register, go to radusa.org.

 

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