Choreographer Trey McIntyre will act as a mentor to the fellow. Courtesy BalletX.

BalletX's New Choreographic Fellowship Has Its First Recipient

This story originally appeared in the December 2015/January 2016 issue of Pointe.

BalletX's new fellowship initiative has chosen its first recipient: New York–based choreographer Yin Yue.


Yue was born and raised in Shanghai, China, and has an MFA from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts. The joint fellowship panel—including BalletX artistic staff, Wendy Whelan, choreographer Trey McIntyre and others—chose her from 50 international applicants. She's choreographed on companies like Northwest Dance Project and shown work at such venues as Jacob's Pillow. Yue will have January and February to create a new piece on BalletX and be mentored by McIntyre, who will create a separate piece during the same period.

“I think that the two of us creating at the same time will help my own process," says McIntyre. “When you're mentoring someone and articulating what you see, you're giving voice to new parts of yourself, too."

With his extensive experience coaching, teaching and guiding students, McIntyre is an advocate for fellowships like this one. “Choreographers don't spend a lot of time receiving feedback—what we do is very solitary. I longed for this early in my own career," he says.

BalletX will provide Yue's choreographer's fee, costume design budget and travel expenses. McIntyre is open to his mentorship extending into the logistical side of creating a new ballet, but he doesn't intend to set parameters on the relationship. “I don't want to impose my worldview. What I have to offer is about opening up what is authentic within our own selves."

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