Just for fun

5 Dancers and Their Cats You Need to Meet Right Meow

Boon, Lauren Lovette's furry friend. Photo via @laurenlovette on Instagram.

There's nothing more purrrrfect than some fabulous trinas and their feline friends. We're not kitten: these bonds are paw-sitively adorable! From hanging out backstage to working out together and more, these pairs will pas de chat their way straight into your heart.


1. New York City Ballet principal Gonzalo Garcia and Gordo

Posing above with NYCB principal Megan Fairchild, Gonazalo's cat Gordo is one of the most important (and, arguably, one of the fluffiest) things in his life. The pair do everything together like taking lazy Sunday naps and applying for dual citizenship. Gordo was was even featured on NYCB's Insta, casually living out a million dancers' dream.

2. Miami City Ballet corps member Ella Titus and Gatsby

Titus is a cat lady and proud. Her Insta is FILLED with glam shots of her cat Gatsby, who, if you take a peek, looks like one amazing cuddle buddy and a welcomed reprieve after a long day at dance. But when it matters, Gatsby's there egging Titus on in her dance career, acting as her dance partner, travel companion, and personal trainer.

3. New York City Ballet principal Lauren Lovette and Boon

A pink, sparkly, beautiful tutu covered in delicate, white lace? Forget about it. Boon just wanted the box. Lovette rescued her adorable feline friend last year, urging others to do the same. From cuddles with tutu boxes to pointe shoes, Boon now lives vicariously through Lovette and her incredible dance career.

4. Los Angeles Ballet principal Petra Conti and Misiu

There's only one thing that could make a White Swan tutu even better. And that's a cat to go with it. Conti and fellow LA Ballet Principal Eris Nezha are the proud parents of two Siberian cats, Misiu and Frida. Follow these two fluff balls on their very own Insta that they share with the couple's four parakeets.

5. American Ballet Theatre principal Herman Cornejo and Mila

Nothing says true love like letting a foot—let alone a dancer's foot—scratch your chin. And if this isn't a big enough testament to these two's relationship, their matching outfits for this year's World Cup definitely are.

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Modeled by Daria Ionova. Darian Volkova, Courtesy Elevé Dancewear.
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