Imagine this scenario: You get a text from a friend just as you're heading into ballet class, and have to answer as quickly as possible. Now, if you were heading into a juggling class, or water polo match, or fencing practice, you'd be able to send a quick emoji in response. But alas, you're forced to type out a full sentence. Because, to the ballet world's collective frustration, There. Is. No. Ballet. Emoji. Until now...

According to Emojipedia, the site for all things emoji-related, a ballet shoe emoji is slated to come out later this year (the exact date hasn't been announced yet) as part of Emoji Version 12.0. The proposal came from Australia-based tech company manager and ballet fan Rüdiger Landmann. Landmann proposed three separate ballet emojis: a ballerina, a male ballet dancer and a pair of pointe shoes. Only the pointe shoe emoji was approved, and we'll be honest, it doesn't look like any pointe shoe we've ever seen. It's more like a pink loafer with ribbons attached. But we're trying not to complain, as this is definitely a (wobbly, given the shape of that shoe) step in the right direction.


The ballet shoe emoji is in good company. It will be released with a group of accessibility emojis, including a deaf person, a person in a wheelchair, a person with a probing cane, and more, as well as people of different races and genders holding hands, showing a real increase in representation. You can check out all of the new emojis (including the ever-useful garlic, yo-yo and brown square) in the video below.

We'd love to see tutu, barre, tights and leotard emojis next, as well as those depicting other forms of dance. If you're passionate about seeing more ballet on your phone, you can submit your own proposal for new emojis here.

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