Ingrid Silva and her dog, Frida Kahlo. Nathan Sayers.

The 8 Ballet Dogs You Need to be Following on Instagram

You're probably already following your favorite dancers on Instagram, but did you know that you can follow many of their dogs, too? We rounded up some of our favorite dog-centered accounts and hashtags to keep you pawsitively entertained (sorry, we can't help ourselves).


Cora and Maya (American Ballet Theatre's Sarah Lane and Luis Ribagorda)

Sarah Lane and Luis Ribagorda's pups Cora and Maya update their profile pretty frequently. Often accompanying Lane to the ABT studios, they can also be seen using tutus or piles of pink tights as dog beds.

Frida Kahlo (Dance Theatre of Harlem's Ingrid Silva)

French bulldog Frida Kahlo follows her mom, Ingrid Silva, almost everywhere. Frida's profile shows that she enjoys long walks in the park and dressing up in matching costumes with Silva for Halloween. Frida even kept Silva company during her Pointe cover shoot. With over 11,000 followers, we think Frida's doing pretty well.

Zipper Fly DeBona-Tilton (Ballet West's Allison DeBona and Rex Tilton)

A self-described ballet lover, this Salt Lake City-based Shih Tzu seems to live a pretty good life. He's especially fond of pointe shoes and pumpkin spice lattes.

Pickles (ABT's Lauren Post)

While you can follow Pickles on her own Instagram page (it is 2019 after all), she's also frequently featured on owner Lauren Post's profile. Like most ABT dogs, Pickles seems to spend a lot of time lounging in the studio. She might sometimes have bad hair days, but she's not letting them get in her way.

Quincy Peanut (New York City Ballet's Isabella LaFreniere)

NYCB pup Quincy seems to have a voracious appetite for ice cream (also seen here and here). Like most millennials, Quincy also has a soft spot for Harry Potter.

Leonidas (The Mikhailovsky Ballet's Julian Mackay)

With his dad Julian Mackay living so far away from his native Montana, Leonidas (Leo for short) is glad to be there to keep him company in Russia. Leo's profile shows him to be highly cultured. In addition to ballet, he has a taste for fine art and loves spending time in the theater. He's also very well traveled.

Riley (ABT's Devon Teuscher)

Unlike many of his canine peers, Riley doesn't have his own profile, but he does have his own hashtag, #thelifeofri, which many ABT dancers use to post shots of him. He can be seen making cameos in rehearsal videos with stars like James Whiteside, or hanging out in his favorite spot; under the piano, on a tutu.

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