Are You A Budding Choreographer? This Competition May Be for You.

When you're an emerging choreographer, nothing's better than free space, beautiful dancers, exposure to artistic directors and a chance to showcase your work. From now until December 15, Ballet Arkansas is accepting applications for its Visions Winter 2017 Choreographic Competition. The competition, which will be held on March 3, gives dancemakers five days to choreograph on Ballet Arkansas dancers, culminating in a public performance in front of a panel of judges (which includes Kansas City Ballet artistic director Devon Carney). The winner receives a contract to produce their completed work at a Ballet Arkansas main stage performance. Chosen applicants must be available for rehearsals February 25-March 3 and will receive a travel stipend during their stay.

Members of Ballet Arkansas in a piece by 2016 Visions Choreographic Competition winner Jimmy Orrante. Photo by Cranford Co, Courtesy Ballet Arkansas.

Visions, now in its third year, has expanded into a semi-annual event, with its winter competition held at the Walton Arts Center in Fayetteville and its summer competition held in Little Rock. (Applicants not selected for the event on March 3 will be automatically added to the summer applicant pool.) It's just one of several signs of growth for Ballet Arkansas since coming under the helm of artistic director Michael Bearden in 2013. In addition to adding resident choreographer Kiyon Gaines to the roster, the company has expanded its touring, increased its board membership and acquired new rehearsal space in downtown Little Rock. For more information on how to apply, click here.

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