Hi there, fans of the Ballerina Project (so, all of you). Do you want the good news first, or the bad news?

The bad? We were afraid of that. OK:

The Ballerina Project—an 18-year labor of love by photographer Dane Shitagi, featuring images of gorgeous dancers in striking settings—is coming to an end.

The good? Many of those stunning images will be featured in a Ballerina Project book, set for release in the fall of 2019.


The news was just announced on the project's hugely popular Instagram page. Why is the project shuttering? "Without a balanced creative and fiscal pathway to the future it was not possible to carry on," according to the caption. Shitagi stopped shooting Ballerina Project photos at the end of 2018, although new images will continue to roll out until March (give or take) of this year.

After you mourn that loss—alongside the hundreds of commenters on the post—take a moment to get excited about the book. The announcement included an image of the cover, and (unsurprisingly) it looks beautiful.

Be sure to follow @ballerinaproject_ for more book news—and to savor the last Ballerina Project images. 😢

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