Audition Advice

10 Artistic Directors Share What They're Looking For in a Dancer

Photo by Jim Lafferty for Pointe.

Have you ever attended an audition and wished that you knew what the director was looking for? We've rounded up some of our favorite quotes from our Director's Notes column over the past few years to give you a deeper glimpse into the minds of 10 artistic directors.

Ashley Wheater, Joffrey Ballet

"I want to develop and nurture artists," says Wheater, seeking "people who are not afraid to be expressive, and understand all the layers that go into making a work above and beyond the steps."

Ingrid Lorentzen, Norwegian National Ballet

"I like athletic classical dancers, with very strong footwork and articulation," Lorentzen says. "But it's also about the feeling I get from them, who I think can adapt to the Norwegian way."


Gen Horiuchi, Saint Louis Ballet

"The minute you walk into the studio you are being evaluated," says Horiuchi. "I look for individuals who are technically and artistically well-rounded. I also look at how they engage with my dancers. Presence and personality are important."

Kevin O'Hare, The Royal Ballet

The Royal Ballet doesn't hold auditions, but if it's your dream company, your best bet is to find a way into its affiliated training program. "My first stop is The Royal Ballet School," says O'Hare, who assesses RBS students throughout their training. "I love somebody who really moves. A natural dance quality and musicality are so important. If you've got that, you can always work on the technique."

Adam Sklute, Ballet West

"I like an artist who creates magic onstage. Also someone who listens, because it's that attention to stylistic detail that matters so much."

Robert Hill, Orlando Ballet

Hill's primary focuses are solid technique and artistic versatility. "They have to be classically strong, but they have to be able to boogie," he says.

Devon Carney, Kansas City Ballet

"Musicality is paramount to me, as is attentiveness to the material and being able to exactly reproduce it quickly," says Carney. He also places great importance on a dancer's demeanor, professional appearance, resumé and photo.

Steven Wistrich, City Ballet of San Diego

"I look for dancers who are intelligent—right away they're picking up the steps," says Wistrich. "I look for personality—if they are dancing from the inside out rather than the outside in. I really like dancers who have a voice, who have something to express—with a light in their eyes. They shine."

Kevin Irving, Oregon Ballet Theatre

"I want dancers who can dance—that's something that can't be taught," says Irving. "I'm as much a sucker for a beautifully shaped foot or a great line, but I'm always drawn to people, even when they're young, who can embody that poetry."

Terrence Orr, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre

"The look of the dancer is very important," says Orr, "and that can be defined in all kinds of ways. I want dancers who are not only great technicians but also gifted actors. An equally important part of the audition process is having conversations with the dancer to get to know their heart and how they will fit in."

Summer Intensive Survival
Getty Images

There's a sweet spot toward the end of August—after summer intensives have wrapped up and before it's time to head back to school or work—where the days are long, lazy and begging to be spent neck-deep in a pile of good books. Whether you're looking for inspiration for the upcoming season or trying to brush up on your dance history, you can never go wrong with an excellent book on ballet. We've gathered eight titles (all available at common booksellers like Amazon and Barnes and Noble) guaranteed to give you a deeper understanding of the art form, to add to your end-of-summer reading list.

Keep reading... Show less
Site Network
James Yoichi Moore and Noelani Pantastico warm up onstage. Angela Sterling, Courtesy SDC.

On a sunny July weekend, hundreds of Seattle-area dance fans converged on tiny Vashon Island, a bucolic enclave in Puget Sound about 20 miles from the city. They made the ferry trek to attend the debut performance of the fledgling Seattle Dance Collective.

SDC is not a run-of-the-mill contemporary dance company; it's the brainchild of two of Pacific Northwest Ballet's most respected principal dancers: James Yoichi Moore and Noelani Pantastico. The duo wanted to create a nimble organization to feature dancers and choreographers they felt needed more exposure in the Pacific Northwest.

Keep reading... Show less
News
Roman Mejia in Robbins' Dances at a Gathering. Erin Baiano, Courtesy NYCB.

The Princess Grace Foundation has just announced its 2019 class, and we're thrilled that two ballet dancers—New York City Ballet's Roman Mejia and BalletX's Stanley Glover—are included among the list of über-talented actors, filmmakers, playwrights, dancers and choreographers.

Keep reading... Show less
Trending
The Royal Ballet's Alexander Campbell and Yasmine Naghdi in Ashton's The Two Pigeons. Tristram Kenton, Courtesy ROH.

While most ballet casts are 100 percent human, it's not unheard of for live animals to appear onstage, providing everything from stage dressing to supporting roles. Michael Messerer's production of Don Quixote features a horse and a donkey; American Ballet Theatre's Giselle calls for two Russian wolfhounds; and Sir Frederick Ashton's La Fille Mal Gardee requires a white Shetland pony. Another Ashton masterpiece, The Two Pigeons, is well known for its animal actors. But though ballet is a highly disciplined, carefully choreographed art form, some performers are naturally more prone to flights of fancy—because they're birds.

Keep reading... Show less