USA IBC 2014 Junior Divison Gold Medal Winner and current American Ballet Theatre corps de ballet dancer Gisele Bethea and Michal Wozniak performing in 2014's second round. Photo by Jim Lafferty for Pointe.

Applications for the 2018 USA IBC are Now Open... And They Changed the Age Requirements

Every four years, dancers from around the world gather in Jackson, Mississippi to compete for medals, cash prizes, scholarships and company contracts as part of the USA International Ballet Competition. While every competition boasts famous former competitors, the USA IBC's impressive list includes Isaac Hernandez, Sarah Lamb, Misa Kuranaga, Nina Ananiashvili, Brooklyn Mack, Daniil Simkin and many more. Though the competition runs from June 10-23 of 2018, it's not too early to apply; applications for the 11th USA IBC opened this week.

If you're 14 years old but itching to enter the competition circuit, it's your lucky year. USA IBC has lowered its age requirement from 15 to 14 (the Prix de Lausanne made a similar change last month). Older dancers can also participate; the competition has extended the senior division limit from 26 to 28 years of age.


2014 USA IBC competitors in rehearsal. Photo by Jim Lafferty for Pointe.

In other USA IBC news, John Meehan will act as the 2018 International Jury Chair. The former Australian Ballet and American Ballet Theatre dancer is in charge of gathering the group of jurors. So far we know that Stanton Welch, Marcia Haydee and Xiomara Reyes are on the list.

The initial portion of the application is due on January 8, giving entrants until February 5 to download the Round I repertoire music for the required video submission. Can't wait till June? You can keep track of your preparations with the USA IBC's handy countdown clock.


USA IBC 2014 Junior Division Silver Medal Winner and current Houston Ballet demi-soloist Mackenzie Richter. Photo by Jim Lafferty for Pointe.

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