Generosa in Susan Stroman's TAKE FIVE…More or Less. Photo by Lindsay Thomas, Courtesy PNB.

Steal Angelica Generosa's Workout Secrets, Plus Her Favorite Music for Ab Work

Pacific Northwest Ballet soloist Angelia Generosa uses cross-training to tackle the company's varied repertoire.

Cross-training philosophy: Pacific Northwest Ballet soloist Angelica Generosa kicked up her workout regimen a few seasons ago when she was first dancing "Rubies," along with a lot of contemporary rep. "I realized that I couldn't afford to get hurt," she says. "I had to take time to take care of my muscles, so they could recuperate and feel good for whatever PNB asked me to do." Now in her seventh season, Generosa acknowledges that just stretching before class isn't enough. "Maintenance is really important. Know what you need before and after class."

At the gym: She starts any workout (or busy day at the studio) with a 10-minute elliptical or bike warm-up. Generosa developed tendonitis in her left knee a few years ago, so this prepares the joint for more strenuous activity. Then, she'll do 20 to 45 minutes of cardio on the treadmill or elliptical; upper-body work, like arm circles while holding 10-pound free weights; ab exercises; and stretching, especially her quads after running.


Easing into the day: During the season, she arrives at least 30 minutes before class to stretch, roll out and warm up her knee. Back-strengthening exercises, like five slow reps of the cobra pose, keep a previous sacroiliac joint injury in check. She also lies with her back flat against the ground and both legs in tabletop, and lightly taps one foot at a time to the ground for 15 to 20 sets. "It activates my core, so I won't be wonky and maybe hurt myself."

Heating things up: During her off season, Generosa stays active with gym visits and hour-long sessions at CorePower Yoga three times a week. The heated class mixes flowing yoga sequences with abdominal work. "It helps me stay limber and definitely gets the blood pumping," she says. "I also like sweating it all out."

Backstage during The Nutcracker. Photo by Lindsay Thomas, Courtesy PNB.

Pre-class playlist: "I'm into Imagine Dragons right now," says Generosa, who uses their music as a soundtrack for ab work. Beyoncé is another top choice.

Juicy stretch: Generosa's favorite yoga pose is reverse warrior. "It feels great on your sides, your back and also your arms. And that low lunge feels really good."

What Fuels Her

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Breakfast: toast with avocado and a scrambled egg on top

Snack: PNB's lunch break isn't until 2 pm, so Generosa brings a banana, a chocolate chip Clif Bar and trail mix.

Lunch: She'll eat leftovers or grab something from the nearby grocery. "I like to make my own salad, or sometimes they have mini meals, like a fruit and hummus plate or a protein bowl."

Dinner: Generosa usually cooks. Homemade veggie pasta with cheese and extra vegetables is a recent favorite. If it's a performance day, she'll have something heavier, like steak and fries.

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A Letter from the Editor in Chief

Hi Everyone,

These are challenging times. The social distancing measures brought about by COVID-19 has likely meant that your regular ballet training has been interrupted, while your performances, competitions—even auditions—have been cancelled. You may be feeling anxious about what the future holds, not only for you but for the dance industry. And that's perfectly understandable.

As you adjust to taking virtual ballet class from your living rooms, we here at Pointe are adjusting to working remotely from our living rooms. We've had to get a little creative, especially as we put our Summer Issue together, but like you we're taking full advantage of modern technology. Sure, it's a little inconvenient sometimes, but we're finding our groove.

And we know that you will, too. We've been utterly inspired by how the dance community has rallied together, from ballet stars giving online classes to companies streaming their performances to the flood of artist resources popping up. We've loved watching you dance from your kitchens. And we want to help keep this spirit alive. That's why Pointe and all of our Dance Media sister publications are working nonstop to produce and cross-post stories to help you navigate this crisis. We're all in this together.

We also want to hear from you! Send us a message on social media, or email me directly at abrandt@dancemedia.com. Tell us how you're doing, send us your ideas and show us your dance moves. Let the collective love we share for our beloved art form spark the light at the end of the tunnel—we will come out the other side soon enough.

Best wishes,

Amy