(photo by Fabrizio Ferri)

Alessandra Ferri to Reprise Juliet

Alessandra Ferri's return to the stage has been a triumphant one: The 52-year-old has starred in Martha Clarke's Chéri alongside Herman Cornejo, dazzled in Wayne McGregor's critically-acclaimed Woolf Works at The Royal Ballet and been a perfect example of the magic that can happen when a ballerina reinvents her career.

Now, she will return to American Ballet Theatre (where she was a principal dancer until 2007) as a guest artist to dance Juliet in the company's production of Romeo and Juliet, opposite Cornejo, on June 23, 2016. Coincidentally, Juliet was also the role she performed at her ABT retirement. Who knows what she'll bring to her interpretation now, after the experiences she's had since then. We can't wait to find out!


Visit ABT's website for more info.

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