In rehearsal for Duse with Hamburg Ballet principal Alexadr Trusch. Photo by Holger Badekow, Courtesy Hamburg Ballet.

Italian Renaissance: Alessandra Ferri on Her Return to Performing

This story originally appeared in the December 2015/January 2016 issue of Pointe.

Alessandra Ferri, the iconic dance actress, has emerged, at age 52, from a six-year retirement into an astonishing post-career. After successes with projects like Martha Clarke's Chéri and the critically praised Woolf Works at The Royal Ballet, Ferri has been tapped by Hamburg Ballet's John Neumeier as the muse for his Duse—Myth and Mysticism of the Italian Actress Eleonora Duse. As an actress at the turn of the 20th century, Duse's performances were both highly popular and critically acclaimed, and she was lauded by writers like Anton Chekhov and George Bernard Shaw. The ballet, set to music by Benjamin Britten and Arvo Pärt, will premiere on December 6.


Why did you return to performing?

I realized a part of me was switched off. I love creating and dancing and performing with other artists. I feel very much alive when I do that. The first thing I did—The Piano Upstairs—was a fascinating collaboration with John Weidman. Then Martha Clarke came along (with Chéri). It all happened without me looking for it. Now I'm more conscious of my desire for doing it. At the moment I feel free and much more appreciative of the talent I was given.

Photo by Holger Badekow, Courtesy Hamburg Ballet.

What does John Neumeier wish to explore with you in Duse?

I think John has always been very passionate about theater and acting. Eleonora Duse was the first modern actor. She completely changed the art form. She was a very complex, strong and vulnerable woman and very devoted to her art. It's funny—when I'm talking about her, I'm saying the same things about myself. She felt alive when she was onstage.

What is it like to portray a real-life character?

It's so hard in dance to just be biographical because dance is the language of emotion. Duse starts out at the end of her life. John is interested in exploring the different woman she was with all these men in her life, like the poet Gabriele D'Annunzio. She really wanted to help and console people. She suffered a lot in her life and was very sensitive to suffering.

Did you make any special preparations for the role?

I visited two museums—one in Venice and one in Asola—which house some of Duse's original letters and clothes. I also read the book Il Fuoco by D'Annunzio, which describes her life.

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