Alexei Ratmansky with members of the corps de ballet. Photo by Gene Schiavone, Courtesy American Ballet Theatre.

ABT's Ratmansky Project Lays the Groundwork for Big Dreams

When the choreographer Alexei Ratmansky joined American Ballet Theatre as artist in residence eight years ago, the company hadn't had a house choreographer since the days of Antony Tudor. The gamble seems to have paid off handsomely. In that time Ratmansky has either made or restaged 12 ballets for the company. In 2011, the company extended his contract to 2023. Such commitments are practically unheard of at a time when top dancers and choreographers hop from company to company, continent to continent. The scale and ambition of the works Ratmansky is making for ABT is a rarity too, in a world of tight budgets, scant rehearsal time and pared-down esthetics.


Set design for new "Harlequinade." Courtesy ABT.


But big ideas and continuity are expensive. To make such projects feasible, ABT launched The Ratmansky Project in early 2016, a fundraising campaign specifically geared to funding new or restaged Ratmansky ballets. The goal is to bring in $15 million over five years. By the time the campaign was announced last spring, it had already funded three works: Serenade after Plato's Symposium, The Golden Cockerel and Whipped Cream. The latter two involve lavish designs, as will a new Harlequinade, scheduled to premiere in March.


Alexei Ratmansky. Photo by Gene Schiavone, Courtesy ABT.

As ABT's new executive director, Kara Medoff Barnett, points out, "the cost to produce each new full-length ballet is roughly $3 million. And we want to produce a full-length Ratmansky ballet or several new one-act works each year." In the next nine months, Ratmansky will create a new ballet, Songs of Bukovina, with music by the Ukrainian-born composer Leonid Desyatnikov, for the company's fall season, and another big reconstruction, Marius Petipa's 1900 commedia dell'arte ballet Harlequinade. Petipa has become an important source of inspiration. "I learn from the diversity of steps, the changes of mood," says Ratmansky. "All the things that are so brilliantly clear in Petipa's creations."

Not every new Ratmansky ballet will be on the scale of Harlequinade, but, as Barnett comments, "ABT is a company known for theater, for storytelling and spectacle. Why should we limit the imagination of the world's leading ballet storyteller?"

Latest Posts


Laurent Liotardo (post-production by Nik Pate), Courtesy ENB

Catch English National Ballet’s Rising Stars in the Emerging Dancer Competition Livestream

The coronavirus pandemic may have postponed English National Ballet's annual Emerging Dancer competition last spring, but the show must go on—digitally! You can still watch ENB's best and brightest talent during the competition's livestream, taking place on September 22 at 7:20 pm BST (that's 2:20 pm ET). Now in its 11th year, the competition for the Emerging Dancer Award will be broadcast live from the company's East London production studio for the first time. Tickets are available for $6.99 per device and will remain available to view on demand until September 29.

Keep reading SHOW LESS
From left: Alaina Broyles, Courtesy Werner; Courtesy Underwood

Gaynor Minden's Latest Dancer Lineup Features a Body-Positivity Activist and Its First Guy

Pointe shoe brand Gaynor Minden recently welcomed 32 young dancers to its coveted roster of Gaynor Girls. But this year, the company included two applicants who push the boundaries of what it means to dance on pointe. While both Mason Simon Underwood and Colleen Werner are longtime GM wearers, they stand out from the rest of this year's group: Underwood is the first ever Gaynor Guy, and Werner is a body-positivity activist.

Keep reading SHOW LESS
Dylan Giles, Courtesy Festival Ballet Providence

Festival Ballet Providence's New Leap Year Program Gives Dancers Facing a Gap Year a Place to Grow

A new training program at Festival Ballet Providence called Leap Year is welcoming pre-professional and professional dancers who don't have a studio or company to dance for this season.

The endeavor is the brainchild of Kathleen Breen Combes, FBP's executive and artistic director. "I kept getting these emails of dancers saying they just need a place to train this year," says Combes. "I thought, What if we could provide a space for dancers to get stronger, experiment and try new things in a nonjudgmental and no-pressure environment?"

Keep reading SHOW LESS

Editors' Picks