Whether it's spring performances, final exams or preparations for summer intensives, this can be a stressful time of year. While these bigger sources of stress are more obvious, some others aren't as easy to spot, and they can take a toll without you realizing it. Here are three less noticeable ones to keep in mind: 

1. Your friends' stress: If everyone in your studio is freaking out about an upcoming performance, you may feed off each other's nervous energy. A German study found that simply observing someone else complete a stressful task can increase production of the stress hormone cortisol. Try scheduling time with non-dance friends to get some outside perspective. 

2. Multitasking: You may think getting two things done at once would reduce stress, but a study from the University of Irvine found that participants who responded to e-mails all day in the middle of their other work had more fluctuations in their heart rates (a stress indicator). Giving your attention to one thing at a time can also help ensure you're giving it your best effort. Cramming for that science test while backstage at a dress rehearsal may not be the best idea. 

3. Texting instead of talking: Texting a friend can be a quick and fun break during a busy day, but it won't have the same positive effects as verbal conversation. A study published in Evolution & Human Behavior found that teenage girls who talked to their mothers on the phone or in person after a stressful event had lower cortisol levels than those who simply texted. Try giving that friend a call instead when you have a few minutes, and talk through whatever is on your mind.

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Are you a total bunhead who loves to write? You might be the perfect fit for Pointe. We're seeking an editorial intern who's equally passionate about ballet and journalism.

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Sponsored by Ellison Ballet
Rachel Neville, Courtesy Ellison Ballet

If you've got your heart set on dancing for, say, San Francisco Ballet, you should attend a school that specializes in Balanchine, right? Not necessarily: It's actually a misconception that you have to train in a particular style or technique in order to pursue a career in that style. Ellison Ballet in New York City—which specializes in Vaganova technique—is living proof: Graduates of Ellison's year-round program and summer intensives go on to ballet companies that perform in a wide range of styles, and use what they've learned from Vaganova to land jobs.

Here are five reasons why studying Vaganova technique can actually make you a sought-after dancer for any number of ballet companies:

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Karina González in Ben Stevenson's Coppélia. Amitava Sarkar, Courtesy Houston Ballet.

Are you more of a Giselle or a Juliet?

I've always said that my favorite role is Juliet, because of her vulnerability and maturity throughout the ballet. But now that I've performed Giselle, I find her so incredibly enjoyable, from being a village girl who falls in love for the first time to the most tender, almost weightless dancing in Act II.

Are you more at home in the studio or onstage?

I love the time in the studio. The process of starting from zero to getting better each day is so rewarding. My favorite phrase in rehearsals is "Let's do it again, so I can sleep in peace tonight." I need to feel so comfortable in the studio so that when I am onstage there are no bad surprises.

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Dancers certainly don't need anyone to tell them how physical their profession is. But now, we have the data to prove it.

Researchers at InsuranceProviders.com analyzed data from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET), a national organization developed through support from the U.S. Department of Labor/Employment and Training Administration, to determine the 20 most physically demanding jobs in the country. They analyzed the level of strength, stamina, flexibility and coordination required for a host of jobs, and each category was assigned

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