3 Quick Creativity Boosters

Looking at the color blue may help boost creativity.

Dancers are among the most creative people in the world, but that doesn't mean they don't ever get stuck in a rut. Whether you're struggling with choreographer's block or working out a new approach to a tricky piece, try these quick, quirky strategies to get your wheels turning.


1. Look at something blue.
A University of British Columbia study suggests that the color blue is most likely to increase our ability to think creatively. Because we tend to associate it with the ocean and sky, it makes us think of openness in general, letting us feel safer about exploring new ideas.

2. Lie down. Sometimes it helps to literally see things from a different angle. Researchers at the Australian National University found that people were able to solve anagrams (a type of word puzzle) more quickly when lying down versus sitting up.

3. Daydream. It might sound unproductive, but researchers from the University of California, Santa Barbara found that letting your mind wander could actually help with creative problem solving. Try taking a short walk and allowing your thoughts to flow freely—your next great idea could be right around the corner.

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