2020 Emerging Dancer Nominee Carolyne Galvao in Swan Lake. Laurent Liotardo, Courtesy ENB.

English National Ballet Just Named Its 2020 Emerging Dancer Finalists

It's that time of year again: English National Ballet has announced its finalists for the company's Emerging Dancer competition. This highly anticipated annual event, held in front of a live audience and an esteemed panel of judges at London's Queen Elizabeth Hall on May 29, will give six company members from the lower ranks a chance to shine. To prepare, the finalists, who were chosen by their peers, will be paired together and coached by a more experienced company member in a classical pas de deux and a contemporary work. In addition to the jury-selected Emerging Dancer Award, one dancer will receive the People's Choice Award, chosen by the audience. The company will also give out its Corps de Ballet Award, recognizing a corps member for their hard work on and offstage.


The Emerging Dancer Award has been a boon for past recipients; Julia Conway, who won last year, was recently promoted to first artist. "I'm incredibly proud to announce this year's finalists for Emerging Dancer," says artistic director Tamara Rojo in a statement, adding that each brings charisma and artistry to their performances. "I'm so happy for them to have been nominated by their colleagues and those who work with them every day as an acknowledgement of their hard work and commitment last season."

So, without further ado, here are ENB's 2020 Emerging Dancer finalists!

Ivana Bueno

Ivana Bueno is shown from the shoulders up in a black and white portrait, looking directly at the camera with a small closed smile. She has long light brown hair and wears a dark turtleneck sweater.

Ivana Bueno

Karolina Kuras, Courtesy ENB

A native of Mexico, Ivana Bueno trained at Fomento Artístico Cordobés before finishing her training at the Princess Grace Academy in Monaco. She joined ENB in 2018, and has danced the roles of Balinese Princess in Christopher Wheeldon's Cinderella and Spanish in Nutcracker.

Carolyne Galvao

Carolyne Galvao is shown from the shoulders up in a black and white portrait, looking directly at the camera with a small closed smile. She has long, wavy dark hair and wears a white top, and covers her right shoulder with her left hand.

Carolyne Galvao 

Karolina Kuras, Courtesy ENB

Born in Brazil and trained at the Bale do Teatro Escola Basileu França, Carolyne Calvao was a 2018 Prix de Lausanne prize winner and won the silver medal at the 2018 USA International Ballet Competition in Jackson, MS. She joined ENB in 2018, and has danced Spanish and Chinese in Nutcracker.

Emily Suzuki

Emily Suzuki is shown from the shoulders up in a black and white portrait, looking directly at the camera with a small closed smile. Wearing a white scoop-neck shirt, she touches her neck with her left hand as her dark hair blows back behind her.

Emily Suzuki

Karolina Kuras, Courtesy ENB

Emily Suzuki has been a member of ENB since 2016. She trained at the Acri Horimoto Ballet Academy in her home country of Japan, furthering her studies at the English National Ballet School. In 2017 and 2019, she danced the role of the Chosen One in Pina Bausch's Rite of Spring.

Miguel Angel Maidana

Miguel Angel Maidana is shown from the shoulders up in a black and white portrait, looking directly at the camera with a small closed smile. He has short, curly hair, brown eyes and wears a white T-shirt and a small hoop earring in his left ear.

Miguel Angel Maidana

Karolina Kuras, Courtesy ENB

Miguel Angel Maidana trained at the Escuela de Danza Mainumby in his native Paraguay, later studying at Academia de Ballet de Moscù in Argentina and the Brussels International Ballet School in Belgium. He was one of eight prizewinners at the 2018 Prix de Lausanne and joined ENB later that year. He's since danced the role of Birbanto in Le Corsaire.

Victor Prigent

Victor Prigent is shown from the elbows up in a black and white portrait, looking directly at the camera with a small closed smile. HE has short dark hair, dark eyes and wears a black turleneck shirt.

Victor Prigent

Karolina Kuras, Courtesy ENB

Victor Prigent, originally from France, trained at schools in French Guiana, Paris, Chicago and San Francisco. He joined ENB in 2017 after dancing with San Francisco Ballet and Atlanta Ballet for a season each. He has since performed the roles of Chinese and Freddie in Nutcracker, the Beggar Chief in Manon and Neopolitan in Swan Lake.

William Yamada

William Yamada is shown from the chest up in a black and white portrait, looking directly at the camera with a small smile. He wears a lack T-shirt and has short dark hair and dark eyes.

William Yamada

Karolina Kuras, Courtesy ENB

Born in Japan, William Yamada was trained by his mother at London's Young Dancers Academy and later studied at the Royal Ballet School. He joined ENB in 2015. In addition to dancing the role of Freddie in Nutcracker, Yamada recently made his debut in WIlliam Forsythe's Playlist (Track 2).

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A Letter from the Editor in Chief

Hi Everyone,

These are challenging times. The social distancing measures brought about by COVID-19 has likely meant that your regular ballet training has been interrupted, while your performances, competitions—even auditions—have been cancelled. You may be feeling anxious about what the future holds, not only for you but for the dance industry. And that's perfectly understandable.

As you adjust to taking virtual ballet class from your living rooms, we here at Pointe are adjusting to working remotely from our living rooms. We've had to get a little creative, especially as we put our Summer Issue together, but like you we're taking full advantage of modern technology. Sure, it's a little inconvenient sometimes, but we're finding our groove.

And we know that you will, too. We've been utterly inspired by how the dance community has rallied together, from ballet stars giving online classes to companies streaming their performances to the flood of artist resources popping up. We've loved watching you dance from your kitchens. And we want to help keep this spirit alive. That's why Pointe and all of our Dance Media sister publications are working nonstop to produce and cross-post stories to help you navigate this crisis. We're all in this together.

We also want to hear from you! Send us a message on social media, or email me directly at abrandt@dancemedia.com. Tell us how you're doing, send us your ideas and show us your dance moves. Let the collective love we share for our beloved art form spark the light at the end of the tunnel—we will come out the other side soon enough.

Best wishes,

Amy