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2019 Princess Grace Award Winners Include Roman Mejia and Stanley Glover

Roman Mejia in Robbins' Dances at a Gathering. Erin Baiano, Courtesy NYCB.

The Princess Grace Foundation has just announced its 2019 class, and we're thrilled that two ballet dancers—New York City Ballet's Roman Mejia and BalletX's Stanley Glover—are included among the list of über-talented actors, filmmakers, playwrights, dancers and choreographers.


Honoring the legacy of Princess Grace Kelly of Monaco, the Princess Grace Foundation bestows awards to distinguished artists in theater, film and dance each year. Both Mejia and Glover are the recipients of Dance Fellowships. These two young danseurs are joined by six other dancer performance and choreography winners including Juilliard School student Jared Brown, ODC/Dance's Mia Chong, Dorrance Dance's Byron Tittle, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago choreographer Rena Butler and CounterPulse choreographer Randy Reyes. Lula Washington Dance Theatre's Tommie-Waheed Evans has received an Honoraria. Former Princess Grace Award winners Kyle Abraham, Raja Kelly and Camille A. Brown have been awarded grants from the Foundation.

Learn more about the two ballet winners below.

Roman Mejia

At only 19, New York City Ballet corps dancer Roman Mejia has been hailed as the company's newest wunderkind. Mejia joined as an apprentice in August 2017, and was promoted to the corps de ballet just two months later. Since entering NYCB's ranks he's shone as Puck in George Balanchine's A Midsummer Night's Dream, a sailor in Jerome Robbins' Fancy Free and in Kyle Abraham's boundary-pushing The Runaway. Mejia was named one of Dance Magazine's 2019 25 to Watch. Mejia has ballet in his blood; before attending School of American Ballet, he trained under his parents, both former dancers, in Fort Worth.

Stanley Glover

Born and raised in Chicago and trained at Philadelphia's University of the Arts, Stanley Glover made it to the top 20 on Season 11 of FOX's "So You Think You Can Dance" before joining BalletX. His early career also included a principal role in the Las Vegas production of Cirque du Soleil's Mystère. Most recently at BalletX, Glover danced the role of The Snake in Annabelle Lopez Ochoa's new full-length The Little Prince.

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