Training
PNB's Margaret Mullin in company class. Photo by Angela Sterling, Courtesy PNB

Suddenly, all I could see in the mirror was a fuzzy, dancer-shaped outline. I had accidentally rubbed out my contacts right before pliés and, frustrated, resigned myself to an unproductive two hours. As class progressed, however, something strange happened: I felt far more relaxed and placed. My balances at barre were steadier, I didn't have a single wobble in center adagio, I nailed every pirouette and even my jumps felt freer. Could the reason for this stellar class be that I wasn't depending on my reflection?

So much of dancers' training is through sight, usually with the mirror as an aid. From toddlers to top-ranked company members, nearly every hour of studio time is spent in front of the mirror, honing technique in class and perfecting choreography in rehearsal. Too often, however, the mirror becomes a crutch, and the very reasons you need it for your training can become detrimental. Luckily, awareness and refocusing can help break the habit.

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Inside PT

Cross-Train in the AM

Between class and auditions, rehearsals and performances, it may seem like there’s not enough time in the day to fit in cross-training. That’s why many dancers swear by hitting the elliptical or their yoga mat early in the morning instead of hitting snooze. Aside from fitting your workout in, research shows that jump-starting your day with physical activity (as opposed to hanging out in a split before barre) has a whole host of additional benefits.

When you cross-train in the morning…

  • You’re more likely to stick with it. If you wait until the end of a full day of dance, it’s easier to skip the gym since you’ll already be exhausted.
  • Your body may burn more fat. A study published in The Journal of Physiology found that a group of men who exercised before breakfast burned fat more efficiently than those who exercised after eating a heavy breakfast. This may be because the body burns fat for fuel instead of carbohydrates when you exercise on an emptier stomach.
  • You might sleep better. Researchers at Appalachian State University found that adults who worked out at 7 am had 75 percent deeper sleep and 20 percent more REM cycles than those who waited until the afternoon or evening to exercise.

 

Make It Happen
Are you ready to make working out early a priority? If you plan your morning the night before, you’re more likely to set yourself up for a successful day.

 

  • Mark your calendar. You wouldn’t skip out on a doctor’s appointment you’ve had on your schedule for months. Similarly, when you pencil in your gym time, you’re more apt to follow through.
  • Invite a buddy. When you know your friend is waking up early to meet you at the gym, you’re less likely to bail on your cross-training plans.
  • Get to bed. Though it’s never good to scrimp on sleep, it’s especially important to wake up feeling rested when physical activity is first on your list.
  • Lay out your clothes (and any special shoes or equipment you’ll need, like a yoga mat) ahead of time, so you’re not rifling through your dresser for a sports bra at the crack of dawn.
  • Pack your bag with anything you’ll need for your dance day if you’re going straight to the studio afterward.
  • Prep your breakfast. Don’t forgo the first meal of the day in order to fit in a workout. Instead, pack a portable breakfast, like a homemade smoothie made the night before, or yogurt, a granola bar and fresh fruit.

 

 

Smarter Stress-Eating
Stressed out? Consider eating fatty fish, such as salmon or tuna. Why? They’re high in omega-3 fatty acids. Aside from being important for heart health, they’re also known to help regulate mood by enabling brain cells to communicate better and possibly by protecting neurons from damage caused by stress over time. Multiple studies suggest that people with a high intake of omega-3s are better able to bounce back from stress or disappointment.

 

Seasonal Seed
This fall, head to the pumpkin patch to score a nutritious snack. Pumpkin seeds are perfect for roasting, and they’re packed with magnesium, which plays a role in energy production and bone development, and fiber, which keeps you full, making them a great choice to nosh on midday. Pumpkins are in season into November, so there is plenty of time to get creative. Here’s how to add them to your diet any time of day.

 

Breakfast: Mix in with oatmeal.
Lunch: Toss in a salad with dried cranberries.
Snack: Grab a handful plain or add to homemade trail mix.
Dinner: Sprinkle on top of squash soup.


 

Performance Tip
If you’re trying to perfect your portrayal of a dramatic character in any story ballet, research suggests you should focus on your chest. A study recently published in the journal PLoS One used eye tracking to determine that observers most frequently looked at the movement of a dancer’s chest when asked to decide if she was enacting happiness or sadness. Don’t underestimate the subtlety of slightly sinking the sternum or proudly presenting the collarbones.

 

Protein Time
Dancers know that protein is an essential part of a healthy diet, since it’s needed to repair and strengthen muscle tissue. But it turns out when you eat protein is also important. Recent research in the Journal of Nutrition found that muscle protein synthesis is up to 25 percent higher when the recommended daily amount, 60 grams, is doled out evenly among breakfast, lunch and dinner. Fuel your muscles every few hours by working protein-rich foods like hard-boiled eggs or almonds into your meals and snacks. —Alexis Stanley


Bright Lights, Bad Balance
Problem: Having trouble balancing onstage in spite of rock-solid centeredness in the studio?
The culprit: The change in visual perception, mostly due to blinding stage lights, negatively affects your dynamic balance, the stability you need as you move through space.
The science: Recent research published in the Journal of Dance Medicine & Science found that a group of pre-professional ballet dancers were able to improve their dynamic balance after just four weeks of doing exercises with their eyes closed. The series of balance tests was integrated into participants’ daily technique class, and those who did the exercises with open eyes didn’t show any improvement in their stability.
The solution: You can’t control the stage lighting, but you can train your body to balance better in conditions that limit your vision. Leading up to a performance, practice dancing with your eyes closed for short portions of barre and centerwork (just make sure your teacher is okay with it beforehand). You’re likely to have better balance control, even if the stage lights make you squint.



Training

Have a question? Click here to send it to Amy and she might answer it in an upcoming issue!

I’m having trouble balancing schoolwork and dance. I come home from a long day and rush through my homework without worrying about whether I did it correctly. Doing homework late at night makes me stressed for the rest of the week and affects my attitude towards dancing. How do I balance both school and dance? –Marie

When I think of my crazy schedule as a teenager, I’m amazed I ever made it through high school! My brain was fried by the time I’d get home from ballet class. It helps to stay super organized. Look at your daily and weekly schedule in advance to find pockets of time to do homework during lunch, study hall or immediately after school. Prioritize what needs to get done, and avoid procrastinating. I used to finish my math homework right after school because it was hardest for me, and save shorter, easier assignments for after dance classes. Sometimes if I was super-exhausted after ballet I would head straight to bed and get up extra early to finish schoolwork.

Take advantage of your breaks between dance classes, or time in the car (unless, of course, you are the one driving). I used go to the library on weekends for a few hours to crank out some study time without the distractions at home. I found I worked way more efficiently when I couldn’t make phone calls, watch TV or raid the pantry. Scheduling out your day, your week and your weekend may seem like a drag, but eventually you’ll find a rhythm and your life will feel more manageable.

 

Training

Have a question? Click here to send it to Amy and she might answer it in an upcoming issue!

I’ve been dancing for eight years and still have poor turnout. I’ve tried many techniques and stretches, but nothing helps. Any advice? —Allison, Kansas

It’s so frustrating when our bodies refuse to bend to ballet’s will! Unfortunately, we’re born with a somewhat fixed degree of external rotation. Your turnout might be naturally limited. My advice is to do the best with what you have. Strengthen your rotator muscles to hold your maximum turnout. Before class, stand in your natural first and fifth positions, taking time to activate and feel your rotators. Maintain these positions during class, and resist the urge to crank your turnout from your knees and ankles or twist your working hip open. As you get stronger, your turnout will look better because you’ll hold it correctly in place.  Also focus on your strengths. Do you have a beautiful stage presence or a great jump? Develop these more! Along with strong technique, they will draw attention away from any imperfections.

When doing relevés on pointe, my roll up from half pointe to full pointe is very jolting. I have strong ankles; it is just the last part of the relevé that I struggle with. What can I do? Alina, California

I spoke with Liz Henry, director of  Westside Dance Physical Therapy, who suspects your intrinsic flexors (the muscles that move your toes) are weak, and recommends an exercise called “doming.”

With your foot flat on the ground, lift the row of knuckles between your metatarsals and your toes. “Allow the toes to be long,” says Henry. “Glide the toes along the floor in the direction of the heel, and create a ‘dome’ at those knuckle joints.” Make sure your toes are not curled or hammered. If you’re having trouble, use your hands to help shape the dome until you find the right foot muscles.

From here, Henry says, “Return back to flat the same way you came, keeping the toes long and straight without picking them up.” Then, keeping the ball of the foot on the ground, lift the toes up and return to flat. Start with 10 to 25 reps, eventually working up to 100.

Also practice going from demi to full pointe in your pointe shoes while sitting in a chair. Apply the doming principle as you articulate your foot (10 to 25 reps). Then, with doming in mind, try relevés at the barre, first with two feet, then one. Once your feet get stronger, you’ll have less need for the barre.

I have a really hard time finding my balance. Do you have any tips?

—Madeline, New York

Your problem may stem from improper alignment or lack of strength. Pay attention to which way you fall. If you fall away from the barre, you’re probably not “on your leg,” meaning the weight of your body is not centered over the ball of your foot. If you fall towards the barre, you’re probably lifting your working hip or sitting into your standing hip. If you’re wobbly in your ankles and torso, work on gaining strength. Check the alignment of your feet, legs, hips, pelvis, rib cage and shoulders from both front and side views on flat and relevé.

Once you nail down the problem, practice! At the studio, in your kitchen, at the bus stop—whenever you can. Set goals (10 seconds, 30 seconds, 2 minutes), and be determined to meet them.

Another tip: Think of pressing down into the floor during relevé, rather than rising up. If you push into the balls of your feet, you’ll engage your entire leg up to the area right underneath the buttocks. You’ll feel taller and much more stable.

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