Vishneva with Marcelo Gomes in Alexi Ratmansky's The Sleeping Beauty 2015. Courtesy ABT.

Diana Vishneva gave her final performance with American Ballet Theater last month after 12 years as a principal. The Russian ballerina made her first appearance with ABT even earlier as a guest artist in 2003. In this video of Aurora's Act III variation from the same year, it's easy to see why Vishneva was in demand all over the world.

While Vishneva has become well known for her dramatic roles, as well as her contemporary work, she is simply exquisite in this quintessential classical variation. At some moments she dances with calm, regal precision; at others, like the manège at 1:40, she floats across the stage with the joy and abandon of a young princess on her wedding day. Her long, sinewy limbs make every movement luxurious, and perfectly accented details demonstrate her individual artistry.

Even though she is saying goodbye to New York, Vishneva's career is sure to keep up its spectacular pace as she heads back to Russia to continue dancing with the Mariinsky Ballet, her home company of 22 years, and to work on new projects. The world will be watching to see what she does next! Happy #ThrowbackThursday!

Views

Sofiane Sylve in Forsythe's Pas/Parts. Photo by Erik Tomasson via After Dark SF.

Remember in the Disney version of Sleeping Beauty when Aurora’s fairy godmothers fight over which dress is best, pink or blue? Watching Petipa’s ballet, you might face a similar conflict: Do you prefer the young, spirited Aurora decked in rose pink from Act I? Or the cool yet lovely dream princess from Act II? In this clip from a 2003 Dutch National Ballet performance, San Francisco Ballet principal Sofiane Sylve embodies the silver radiance of her lunar setting. Her ice-blue tutu barely flares as she sails effortlessly in each attitude turn. Her grace and control are so refined that, if Sylve really were dancing in a mist-filled dream, she wouldn’t disturb a single vapor.

Before joining SFB in 2008, Sylve danced at Dutch National Ballet and later New York City Ballet. In a 2012 Dance Magazine interview with former NYCB star Allegra Kent, Sylve said that she fell in love with ballet for its “relationship with the music.” I’d say that she does that sacred relationship justice. Happy #ThrowbackThursday!

For more news on all things ballet, don’t miss a single issue.

Views

Carla Fracci photographed in 1967. Photo via Amicapercaso.

The Fountain of Youth might be in Italy. Alessandra Ferri, 53, is defying all preconceived notions about the length of ballet careers. But she isn’t the first Italian to do so. Carla Fracci, a former prima ballerina at La Scala Ballet and international guest artist, who started her career in the 1950s, didn’t stop when convention might have told her to.

This clip, from a 1987 television series called the “The Ballerinas,” proves it. At 51 years old, Fracci isn’t doing an easy skip of a variation. Here she tackles one of the hardest dances in the classical canon: the Rose Adagio. Aurora’s iconic dance with four suitors is a challenge in stamina, a test in technique and definitely a trial in composure, particularly during the promenade balance section. When this sequence repeats at the end, the music crescendoing as high as the expectations, Fracci is unflappable. With rock-solid strength and softness rivaling that plush pink tutu, she finishes with an ebullient smile.

Best known for her Giselle portrayal, Fracci has (we think) retired from the stage and taken on humanitarian work later in life. In 2004, she was named a Goodwill Ambassador of the Food and Agriculture Association, a United Nations agency dedicated to fighting hunger around the world. Happy #ThrowbackThursday!

Photo by Giuseppe Pino via Mondadori Portfolio.

For more news on all things ballet, don’t miss a single issue.

Views

Photo via Viviana-Durante.com

Ah, Aurora—the dream role of budding ballerinas and the milestone of professionals. (It’s on the horizon for our June/July cover girl Cassandra Trenary, who makes her New York Aurora debut on June 29). Nearly every prima has performed the role, and Italian dancer Viviana Durante, former principal with The Royal Ballet, is no exception.

With impeccable musicality, Durante seems to pluck the violin’s strings with her toes. Atop this precise staccato footwork undulate soft, swirling arms and an expression that asserts true joy. Sure, Durante may be acting Aurora’s wedding day bliss, but to me that smile seems triumphant: the look of her self-assurance dancing one of ballet’s most challenging yet rewarding roles.

 

Durante established her international reputation with a worldwide performing career. After leaving The Royal Ballet in 2001, she joined American Ballet Theatre and Tokyo’s K-Ballet and guested in Italy, Germany, and beyond. Recently, she’s served on the judging panels for English National Ballet’s Emerging Dancer Competition and this year’s Prix de Lausanne. Happy #TBT!

For more news on all things ballet, don’t miss a single issue.

Views

Paris Opéra Ballet étoiles have to be more than exquisite dancers: They must have all the poise, authority and elegance it takes to command the Palais Garnier stage. As Aurora in this excerpt from a 2000 taping of The Sleeping Beauty, Aurélie Dupont radiates with quintessentially French classicism. Even before she starts dancing, she enthralls with the regal tilt of her chin and arch of an eyebrow while greeting the courtiers. She floats through the variation with delicacy and precision, luxuriating in the classical port de bras but also sustaining each piqué and pirouette.

 

A world-renowned artist during her career, Dupont will now be tested on an even grander level when she succeeds Benjamin Millepied as the artistic director of POB in July. Dupont joins the likes of Brigitte Lefèvre, Rosella Hightower and Violette Verdy, who recently passed away, as a ballerina-turned director at the world’s oldest ballet company. If we could, we’d ask each: Which is more challenging, winning hearts as an étoile commanding the spotlight or as the director guiding it? Happy #ThrowbackThursday!

For more news on all things ballet, don’t miss a single issue.

Dupont gracing the halls of the Palais Garnier. Photo by Mathieu Cesar via Aurélie Dupont.

Views

Dame Antoinette Sibley

In Sleeping Beauty’s Act III wedding pas de deux, the spotlight beams unwaveringly on dancers’ technique; Petipa’s choreography offers little to no reprieve in softening embraces, no rest in loving caresses. In this clip, Dame Antoinette Sibley—a principal at The Royal Ballet from 1956-1989—and Danish-born international star Peter Schaufuss rise to the occasion. Regal and poised, they perform each step with crystalline purity. Just look at the careful way Sibley places one pointed toe on the floor, as if stepping on glass, to rise from her knee. Schaufuss deftly partners her in the formidable pirouette-fish dive section. At the end, he tosses Sibley in the air and catches her effortlessly with one arm, as if he hadn’t just danced some of the most taxing five minutes in classical ballet repertoire.

Peter Schaufuss with Vanessa Harwood of National Ballet of Canada. Photo by Reg. Innell courtesy of the Toronto Public Library

 

Sibley was president of The Royal Academy of Dance from 1991-2012, and she still coaches stars at The Royal Ballet. Peter Schaufuss directed the English National Ballet and instituted the company’s school before founding his own company, the Peter Schaufuss Ballet. He also seems to have an irrepressible ballet gene in his lineage. His son, Luke, is an artist at the Birmingham Royal Ballet. Happy #ThrowbackThursday!

For more news on all things ballet, don’t miss a single issue.

It's two weeks before the March world premiere of American Ballet Theatre's The Sleeping Beauty at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa, California, and principals Diana Vishneva and Marcelo Gomes are hard at work. As the couple begins Princess Aurora and Prince Désiré's Act III wedding pas de deux, they exude a rediscovered sense of classicism that seems strangely exotic. Instead of six o'clock penchées and indulgent développés, Vishneva luxuriates in a world of arabesques allongées, modest extensions, lowered passés and softened ports de bras. But rather than appear antiquated, these stylistic inflections further accentuate what is going on above the waist—the engaging relationship between Aurora and her prince.

ABT's new Sleeping Beauty, a labor of love spearheaded by artist in residence Alexei Ratmansky and co-produced by La Scala in Milan, stands to be the crowning glory of ABT's 75th-anniversary season. “Of all the great full-lengths, The Sleeping Beauty stands as a perfect symbol of classical ballet," says artistic director Kevin McKenzie. “I wanted a production that we could call our own, and Alexei delivered it. It's a perfect anniversary gift."


What makes this version especially distinct is Ratmansky's commitment to restoring Marius Petipa's original choreography, which premiered in St. Petersburg in 1890. A team of régisseurs at the Mariinsky Ballet, using the Stepanov dance notation system, codified The Sleeping Beauty on paper in 1905. The documents were later smuggled out of Russia during the 1917 Russian Revolution; they are now housed at the Sergeyev Collection at Harvard University. Ratmansky and his wife, Tatiana, both of whom learned to read Stepanov notation, referenced this score as well as photographs and other documents to painstakingly reconstruct Petipa's original intention.

“It's fascinating to explore what we can piece together about the historical style and Petipa's choreography," says ABT principal Gillian Murphy, who is also dancing Aurora. “It looks easier because there are lower legs and more demi-pointe, but it actually feels more difficult because you're constantly restraining yourself. It takes extra energy to sort of put the breaks on."

Murphy notes that, for her, Aurora is one of the hardest roles in the classical repertoire because of the stamina and technical clarity it demands. “Sometimes the simplicity and purity of ballet can be the most difficult thing to accomplish and to make exciting," she says.

For principal Paloma Herrera, who performed as Aurora in March (before her May 27 retirement), that is precisely why the rehearsal process is so integral. “You have the technique inside you so that you can be free onstage, especially in a ballet like this," she says. “It's a fairy tale—complete magic."

All photos by Kyle Froman

Next Page

Creating a dialogue with the music: Hyltin in Aurora's Act I solo (photo by Paul Kolnik)

Aurora's Act I solo in The Sleeping Beauty captures the young princess' girlish exuberance. But from a technical standpoint, its four long minutes almost feel like multiple variations. New York City Ballet principal Sterling Hyltin discusses how to master its many moods and tempos.

Calm down

In most productions, Aurora’s solo follows the Rose Adagio—one of the most stressful moments in classical ballet. Don’t let the residual adrenaline throw you off. “It’s helpful that the beginning of the variation is slow and controlled,” Hyltin says. “I use the first series of balances in arabesque to pull myself together. You can also channel the energy left over from the Rose Adagio—it can help you project the young Aurora’s spirit and eagerness.”

Become a part of the onstage world

The  variation is easier to get through if you interact with the other dancers onstage. “I like to distract myself by thinking about the fact that I’m socializing at my birthday party,” Hyltin says. “In theory, the solo is all about Aurora, but I try to make it all about everyone else. You’re surrounded by suitors, and they’re all playing out their own little story arcs. Recognize each of them, and feed off their energy.”

Allow the music to support you

Creating a dialogue with Tchaikovsky’s score is especially helpful during the opening arabesques. “You can play with either the ascent or the descent of each arabesque,” Hyltin says. “When you’re really on your leg, you can alter your phrasing a little to stretch out that moment on pointe. When things don’t work out so well, you can luxuriate in the tombé afterward.”

Let the upper body tell the story

Without effective port de bras, the series of hops on pointe on the diagonal can feel overlong. “The footwork there is very simple, so a lot of that moment is about your upper body,” Hyltin says. Try gesturing to each of your suitors in turn, or raising first one arm, then the other arm, and finally both to fifth. “Every movement should be elegant and regal, acknowledging your subjects. You want to show that Aurora will be a wonderful queen someday.”

Stay on top of the manège

The variation concludes with a challenging manège of rapid coupés jetés and piqué turns, an expression of unbridled joy and energy—which can feel like a shock after the leisurely pace of the preceding sections. “Don’t let yourself get behind the music!” Hyltin says. “It’s hard because you’re exhausted, but if you’re trying to catch up going into that last piqué sequence, you’ll get way too dizzy. Try to stay slightly ahead of the beat in the coupés jetés.” And when you’re done, take a deep breath. “After this solo, you almost feel like you’re finished with the whole ballet,” Hyltin says, laughing. “Some of the hardest parts are right up front. Let yourself relax and enjoy the rest.” 

Sponsored

Videos

mailbox

Get Pointe Magazine in your inbox

Sponsored

Win It!