Training

Your Training: The Hometown Advantage

It’s the American dream, ballet-style: A small-town girl works hard, turns heads in the big city and wins her way to the top of a world-class company. Teresa Reichlen is one such story: Before joining New York City Ballet, she studied at The Russell School of Ballet in Chantilly, VA. “It’s nice to be a big fish in a small pond to start out,” she says. Instead of always dancing in the corps, “you get to perform the challenging parts.”

Several small studios around the country are producing professional-caliber dancers. These schools may not receive the same publicity as their counterparts with companies or boarding schools attached, but they prove that you don’t need high-profile training to make it as a dancer. In fact, the extra attention, performance opportunities and lower-stress environment might be what you need to grow—not just as a dancer, but as an artist.

Greenwich Ballet Academy
Greenwich, CT, and Port Chester, NY
GBA has only been around since 2006, but its strong Vaganova training (modeled after the Vaganova and Bolshoi academies’ eight-year program) is unique in the region. Students get lots of one-on-one attention—classes only have 4 to 15 students. Plus, the studio’s close proximity to New York City means that guest teachers such as American Ballet Theatre principal Irina Dvorovenko and NYCB legend Allegra Kent can easily drop in for the day.
Classes: Ballet, pointe, repertoire, pas de deux, modern, contemporary ballet, men’s class, character, yoga
Number of students: 105 (audition required)
Performances per year: Two or three
Competitions: Youth America Grand Prix
Alumni: Kelsey Connolly (Juilliard)
Fun fact: The Port Chester loft-like studios used to be a Fruit of the Loom factory.

Alexandra Ballet
Chesterfield, MO
Founded in 1949, Alexandra Ballet has made a reputation for itself through Regional Dance America—the school’s pre-professional company recently represented RDA’s Mid-States Regional Ballet Association at the 2010 International Ballet Competition in Jackson, MS. Alexandra Ballet also keeps up a connection with Cincinnati Ballet, whose dancers often give master classes and perform with students.
Classes: Ballet, modern, character, pointe, pas de deux, men’s class, variations, Pilates
Number of students: 200 (no audition required)
Performances per year: Up to 12
Competitions: The school doesn’t emphasize competitions, but supports students who compete.
Alumni: Louise Nadeau (former PNB principal), Antonio Douthit (Alvin Ailey), Rodney Hamilton (Ballet Hispanico), Makensie Howe and Dillon Malinski (Houston Ballet II)
Fun fact: The school was recently filmed for a British documentary called SwanSong, about Alexandra Ballet alum Ian Archer-Watters (former Les Ballets Grandiva dancer).

Metropolitan Ballet Academy
Jenkintown, PA
MBA students benefit from an inside connection to Pennsylvania Ballet: Led by former PAB assistant ballet mistress Lisa Collins Vidnovic, the faculty includes several current and former PAB dancers and artistic staff, including the artistic director of the second company.
Classes: Ballet, modern, jazz, repertoire, pas de deux, men’s class
Number of students: 375 (no audition required)
Performances per year: At least nine
Competitions: Youth America Grand Prix
Alumni: Phoebe Gavula (Pennsylvania Ballet II)
Fun fact: MBA has a special Boys’ Scholarship Program with more than 60 boys enrolled.

Southland Ballet Academy
Fountain Valley and Irvine, CA
Students at this California studio gain connections all over the world—SBA regularly brings in top master teachers, such as Royal Ballet School director Gailene Stock, NYCB principal Megan Fairchild and even Kirov director Yury Fateyev.
Classes: Ballet, pointe, pas de deux, men’s class, Russian character, modern, stretch, Pilates, jazz, hip hop
Number of students: 400 (no audition required)
Performances per year: Three
Competitions: Youth America Grand Prix, Prix de Lausanne, USA International Ballet Competition in Jackson, Helsinki International Ballet Competition
Alumni: Bryn Gilbert (Ballet Memphis), Jamie Kopit (ABT apprentice), Kirby Wallis (Ballet Austin), Jade Payette (The Washington Ballet), Quenby Hersh  (Scottish Ballet)
Fun fact: Southland students are loyal: The school (now almost 30 years old) currently has third-generation students—the grandchildren of some of its original dancers!

The Russell School of Ballet
Chantilly, VA
Directors Karla and Hans Petry, the husband and wife team at The Russell School, offer a nurturing environment, and students and teachers become close in this tight-knit community.
Classes: Ballet, pointe, variations, character, jazz, tap, modern, lyrical, stretch
Number of students: 375–400 (audition required for higher-level classes)
Performances per year: Three
Competitions: No
Alumni: Teresa Reichlen (NYCB principal), Carrie Ellmore-Tallitsch (Martha Graham Dance Company principal), Ian Thatcher (formerly with SFB, PNB and Ballets de Monte Carlo)
Fun fact: The school is beginning its 47th year.

Westside Ballet
Santa Monica, CA
Westside students have a direct link to George Balanchine himself: Director Yvonne Mounsey was an NYCB principal under the choreographer, so she teaches his style as she learned it firsthand.
Classes: Ballet, jazz, pointe, pas de deux, variations
Number of students: 390 (no audition required)
Performances per year: Two
Competitions: No
Alumni: Andrew Veyette (NYCB principal), Melissa Barak (choreographer), Anna Liceica (former ABT soloist), Kylee Kitchens (PNB)
Fun facts: This past summer, New York’s School of American Ballet held a two-week summer session at Westside Ballet.

International Ballet School
Littleton, CO
IBS takes the “international” element of its name seriously, inviting former Bolshoi and Paris Opéra Ballet dancers to teach master classes, and producing stylistically versatile students who go on to dance all over the world—from Monaco to Switzerland to Germany. 
Classes: Ballet, character, contemporary, pointe, variations
Number of students: 60 (no audition required)
Performances per year: Two, plus outreach
Competitions: Youth America Grand Prix, Prix de Lausanne, World Ballet Competition
Alumni: Erin McAffee (The Joffrey Ballet), Anisa Scott (Dresden SemperOper Ballet)
Fun fact: IBS has recently begun purchasing sets and costumes from companies like London Festival Ballet and Houston Ballet. In a recent Peter Pan production, the school rented rigging so that the dancers could fly onstage!


At Your Feet

American Harlequin is in the business of providing dancers with a solid foundation—both literally and figuratively. This year, the dance floor company will award between $500 and $5,000 to 10 aspiring dancers selected at random. You must be an American or Canadian citizen, ages 15 to 21, enrolled in a dance school to enter. Fill out an application at harlequinfloors.com. by November 1.

ABT Down South
The Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School boasts star teachers, an unbeatable connection to American Ballet Theatre and dozens of high-profile alumni. But the school has never been able to offer a full boarding experience complete with dorms and academics—until now. This fall, JKO took the University of North Carolina School of the Arts School of Dance ballet program under its wing. UNCSA faculty members have become certified in the ABT National Training Curriculum, and ABT staff will visit Winston-Salem annually to give master classes, judge exams and scout for Studio Company prospects. ABT staff will also assist the search for a permanent replacement for Ethan Stiefel, who served as the dean of UNCSA’s School of Dance for the past four years before leaving to become artistic director of the Royal New Zealand Ballet. See uncsa.edu.

Healthy Competition

At competitions, it’s usually every man for himself. But the Youth Dance Festival of New Jersey aims to give dancers a place to perform without sacrificing artistry in service of splashy tricks. Winners are chosen, but everyone receives written feedback, a certificate of achievement and access to workshops taught by jury members.
Dates: October 8 and 9
Location: Ramapo College in Mahwah, NJ
Founded: 2005 by Leonid Kozlov
Ages: 9–25
Genres: Ballet, contemporary, jazz, folk dance
Past participants: ABT’s April Giangeruso, Boston Ballet’s Whitney Jensen, Billy Elliot’s Kiril Kulish
To register: Go to ydfofnj.org.

Win Up To $1,000

Can you write passionately about your ballet training? You could win Costume Gallery’s annual Beverly Miller Scholarship. Judges will award up to $1,000 to 19 dancers ages 12 to 21. Selections are based on dedication and financial need. The money can be used for anything that furthers your training. Apply by November 1 at costumegallery.net.



























































































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Andrew Peasgood and Constance Devernay in "The Fairy's Kiss." Photo by Andy Ross, courtesy Scottish Ballet.

From now through January 15, Pointe is streaming Scottish Ballet in Sir Kenneth MacMillan's Le Baiser de la Fée (The Fairy's Kiss). This one-act ballet, based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale "The Ice Maiden," was choreographed for The Royal Ballet in 1960. For more on the ballet's history and for behind-the-scenes footage, click here.

Synopsis

The Lullaby in the Storm
A mother with her child struggles through the storm. The Fairy with her attendants appears and pursues her. The Fairy separates the mother from her child. Passing villagers find the body of the mother, now dead, and guided by the Fairy, they find the child. The Fairy kisses him on the forehead. The villagers become frightened and taking the child with them, they run away.

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Rigorous program, check. Well-rounded technical training, check. Purposeful liberal arts curriculum, check. Study your craft abroad, check! If you are looking for all the above, the Joan Phelps Palladino School of Dance at Dean College truly has it all.

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It's finally the weekend, and we're celebrating the best way we know how—a new ballet video. Juliet Doherty (who trained with San Francisco Ballet and Master Ballet Academy, and is set to star in the dance film, On Pointe), teamed up with Cartoon Network for her latest project.

"Cartoon Network contacted me about their show, Steven Universe, which was coming out with a new vinyl album of the soundtrack of the show," Doherty shared with Pointe. "They told me about one of the show's main characters named, Pearl, who is a strong-willed character but has the grace inspired by a ballerina."

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Mr. Jeremy FIsher, from Sir Frederick Ashton's "The Tales of Beatrix Potter."

Animal roles might not typically be what dancers dream of performing…but they're oh-so-fun to watch. You can't help falling under their spell (and perhaps aspiring to dance one someday). Here's a round-up of some of our favorite furry and feathered roles.

Bunny Hop

Run. Dance in a circle. Pretend to be a rabbit. It might sound like a creative movement combo, but don't let that fool you. The role of Peter Rabbit in Sir Frederick Ashton's The Tales of Beatrix Potter requires fierce technique—not to mention the ability to project personality while wearing an animal head and fur suit.


Four-Legged Interlude

Who do you turn to for halftime entertainment during a quartet of fairy variations? Dancing lizards, mice and a frog of course! This charming quintet of creatures light up the stage in David Bintley's Cinderella.

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Your Career
Photo Courtesy Barry Kerollis.

I was probably about 15 years old when the director of my local dance school, seeing my drive and ambition, asked me to work as a teaching assistant for one of the main ballet instructors. She asked to meet with me to discuss the details of my new job. She explained what my role was in the studio, expectations of me in the position and more. But as we approached the end of my meeting, I wasn't expecting the conversation to take the serious turn that it did.

"Now, Barry, I need you to be very, very careful about how you work with these young girls. Kids are sensitive and, especially considering that you are a man, if you correct them in a way that can be viewed as sexual by either a student or a parent, even if you didn't do anything, you could be jeopardizing your future as a teacher and in this field." The look on my face must have been utter shock; the prospect of losing my job or getting sued over sharing my artform had never crossed my mind. This forever changed my perspective on being a dance educator, and I still find myself overly cautious about the way that I work with my students today.

Unless you've been hiding underneath a holiday blanket, it has become abundantly clear that we are undergoing a massive cultural shift here in the States. It started in the entertainment industry, then shifted to major corporations. Sexual misconduct in the form of harassment and assault that had been swept under the rug for years is bubbling to the surface. Things began to boil quite quickly, and those interested in our performing-arts world were speculating that something was going to be brought up in our tight-knit community, especially considering the hands-on approach that teachers have with students, dancers have with other dancers and artistic staff has while coaching employees. I had to sit on my own hands for over a month, after I was given a heads-up that a major news publication was working on an exposé about Peter Martins and his many alleged abuses (which had been quietly circulating around our dance community for years).

Keep reading at dance-teacher.com.

Your Career
Erica Lall and Shaakir Muhammad in class at American Ballet Theatre's 2013 New York Summer Intensive. Photo by Rosalie O'Connor, Courtesy ABT.

This story originally appeared in the December 2013/January 2014 issue of Pointe.

When Pacific Northwest Ballet School student Madison Abeo was accepted into San Francisco Ballet School's summer session on a partial scholarship, she was thrilled. But then she added up the remaining cost for the program and realized she didn't have the funds. “I really wanted to go," she says, “but we just couldn't make the other half of it work."

Ballet training is expensive. For many families, a trip to a dream summer intensive simply isn't in the budget. SFB was $2,500 out of Abeo's reach. But she was determined. At the suggestion of her aunt, Abeo created a Facebook fan page where she asked for opportunities to babysit or perform odd jobs, and included a link to a PayPal account where friends and family could make donations. Two local dancewear businesses, Vala Dancewear and Class Act Tutu, offered to outfit her for fundraising photos, which a photographer took for her Facebook page for free. By June, Abeo had raised enough for tuition—plus plenty of pointe shoes.

Affording your dream intensive isn't as difficult as you might think. There are a surprising number of eager dance supporters out there. Case in point: On Kickstarter, dance projects have the highest success rate of any type of campaign, with dancers receiving over $4 million in donations through the site since it began. You can also apply for need- or merit-based grants and scholarships, either through your summer program or an outside foundation. Most dancers who want it badly enough can make it happen.


Madison Abeo with other Pacific Northwest Ballet School students in the 2013 School Performance of an excerpt from "Serenade," choreography by George Balanchine. Photo by Rex Tranter, Courtesy Abeo.

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In class at the Bolshoi Ballet Academy summer intensive. Photo by Gene Schiavone, Courtesy Russian American Foundation.

When Complexions Contemporary Ballet's summer intensive program director Meg Paul auditions students for its Detroit intensive, there's one thing that catches her eye for all the wrong reasons. "It's a real pet peeve of mine when a dancer keeps shifting her eyes to me during a phrase," she says. "It tells me that she's not fully invested in the movement, that she's more interested in being watched than in embodying the choreography."

Every summer intensive director has their own list of audition deal-breakers, but there are a handful of universal turnoffs to avoid. "Yes, we want the most talented students, but when talent is paired with a bad attitude or improper etiquette, it gives us pause," Paul says. While certain behaviors may seem minor, they can make all the difference when it comes time for scholarship offers or even acceptance decisions.

DEAL BREAKER #1: Not Presenting Yourself Professionally

An audition is a first impression, and you want to look your best. This begins with researching the specific intensive's audition requirements. "Our audition has a dress code, and we expect dancers to respect that," says Rina Kirshner, director of the Russian American Foundation's Bolshoi Ballet Academy programs. "We want dancers to stand out through hard work and talent, not brightly colored leotards or flowers in their hair."

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