Marlow and Logan Pachciarz in Ma Cong's "Angeli" (photo by Philip Koenig, courtesy Jill Marlow)

The off-season may mean rest and relaxation for some, but these pros see it as an opportunity to dive into their own projects. The results of their efforts—a multi-day festival, an international tour and an outdoor performance series—reflect the various ways that dancers challenge themselves in leadership roles outside of the studio. They’re finding new avenues to explore their artistry, expand their skills and bring ballet to different communities.

Jill Marlow, Kansas City Ballet

General manager, Kansas City Dance Festival

Jill Marlow first became involved with the Kansas City Dance Festival when fellow company members Logan Pachciarz and recently retired Anthony Krutzkamp founded it in 2012. The festival allows dancers from multiple companies, such as Cincinnati Ballet and Nashville Ballet, to come together for two days of performances.

“Our mission is to integrate dancers from different companies with KCB dancers in order to promote work that isn’t often performed in Kansas City,” Marlow says. The three use their personal connections with dancers and choreographers to help determine the repertoire and who gets to perform.

As general manager, Marlow deals with fundraising, advertising and coordinating travel and contracts for the performers. It’s a concerted team effort that Marlow admits was scary and difficult the first year. “You don’t learn these things in a dance studio,” she says. But she’s since become a master at logistical organizing, with newly honed marketing skills and greater confidence approaching potential donors.

Marlow and her co-artistic directors have huge plans for the festival’s future, including a lecture series and expanded educational outreach. “We’d also like the festival to be longer than two days since it’s a great experience for everyone involved.”

John Welker, Atlanta Ballet

Founder, Wabi Sabi

Atlanta Ballet dancer John Welker conceived of his Wabi Sabi program as a way to offer AB dancers a summer gig. The name comes from a Japanese concept about the beauty of the natural world, and to that end, all performances are held outside or in untraditional spaces. “The performers are right on top of the audience,” says Welker. “They see their reactions and their energy.”

The project has a clear set of goals, in addition to offering summer employment: Create new works by young choreographers and introduce dance and ballet to new audiences. Welker notes that keeping the program within the Atlanta Ballet family has been advantageous. “It works with our schedule and I know the dancers really well,” he says.

Wabi Sabi’s choreographers and dancers have access to AB’s production and administrative departments, but Welker books the shows, helps to select the choreographers and casts the dancers. While time management was tough for him at first, he admits that the link with AB takes some of the operational pressure off.

Welker hopes to expand Wabi Sabi into full-time summer employment, but he wants to make sure the unique elements of the performances are kept intact. “If we tour, that usually means performing in venues. I want to find places that speak to the uniqueness of what we present.”

Altan Dugaraa, Boston Ballet

Founder, Mongolian Ballet Development Foundation

Boston Ballet second soloist Altan Dugaraa wants nothing less than to change the face of ballet in his home country of Mongolia. He established the Mongolian Ballet Development Foundation in 2011, and every summer leads a series of tours to the country. “I want to inspire Mongolian dancers,” he says. “There’s a lot of work to be done there.”

Dugaraa, who frequently performs on the international gala circuit, uses his extensive personal contacts to invite guest stars and small touring groups from around the world to perform for Mongolian audiences. So far, he’s featured performers from Cincinnati Ballet, the Ballet Nacional de Cuba, the National Ballet of Canada and the Hamburg Ballet, as well as Boston Ballet.

This summer, his group will perform a new work by BB principal Jeffrey Cirio, with plans to tour Mongolia for two weeks, as well as perform in Japan. “Organizing a tour uses your brain in a different way,” he says. “It’s hard, but performing onstage makes me used to high-pressure situations.”

Dugaraa’s dedication to promoting ballet in Asia doesn’t stop with touring and master classes. “I want to create a dance center,” he says, which he hopes will act as a major regional resource.

 

A Man and a Mission

Admirers of New York City Ballet principal Daniel Ulbricht probably consider “puckish” an ideal adjective for his personality and his dancing, thanks to his definitive performance as Puck in Balanchine’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. They would be surprised to learn that someone so convincing as Shakespeare’s scampish prankster would soberly discuss dancing not only as a responsibility, but as a mission. From his Stars of American Ballet touring company to his Dance Against Cancer event, Ulbricht uses every ounce of his spare time uniting ballet with good causes.

Do you think of yourself as something of a missionary?

You are right to say I have a mission. For instance, I host the New York City Ballet’s Family Saturdays program. Each hour-long session is an introduction to NYCB’s dancers, musicians and repertory for an audience of parents and children. I regularly get them up out of their seats to perform “choreography” of a sort. It’s certainly not Balanchine, but watching the joy they get from participating makes me feel like an ambassador for our craft.

Any missionary impulse involved in your touring group, Stars of American Ballet?

Yes, because we regularly present repertory rarely performed in other cities. It may be either a portion of a major work or an entire one-act classic. The section of Who Cares? danced by four principals is top-shelf Gershwin and Balanchine, and it bowled over audiences wherever we danced it. For Bernstein and Robbins’ Fancy Free, we travel with six dancers plus a set of a Manhattan saloon.

Those two ballets are now considered 20th-century classics. What about today’s choreographers?

I feel obligated to tour with works by the new generation, such as Christopher Wheeldon, Benjamin Millepied and Justin Peck. Their works are expected at a sophisticated venue like Jacob’s Pillow, which we have been invited to revisit July 29–August 2.

Are you planning to tour with other productions requiring a set like the one you commissioned for Fancy?

As a matter of fact, I am thinking about several. My goal is to build a repertory of great works that demand sets and costumes. No specific details now, however, but I will say we are planning to visit a dozen cities this year.

When did you become a dedicated activist fundraiser with the annual Dance Against Cancer benefit?

In 2011, I set up the benefit with Erin Fogarty—she’s director of programming at Manhattan Youth Ballet—to create an event that used the talent of the dance world for a good cause. Erin’s father would later die of cancer. My mother was undergoing chemotherapy. Raising money for the American Cancer Society became our mission.

What was the response from your fellow dancers?

It was overwhelming. We had absolutely no trouble finding classical, modern and folk dancers who wanted to donate their services in memory of a loved one or friend. We started small, performing in the intimate black-box theater of Manhattan Movement & Arts Center. We outgrew MMAC in two years and now perform at the AXA Equitable Center. It has a bigger stage and more space for the audience and dancers to mingle after the performance for a catered buffet. To date, our expected five-year total can be as high as $600,000.

Do you have any spare time?

Not much. In New York City I teach up to five times a week at Manhattan Youth Ballet. In between City Ballet’s spring and fall seasons, I administer the New York State Summer School of the Arts School of Ballet in Saratoga Springs. It keeps me busy.

Harris Green

popular

Rigorous program, check. Well-rounded technical training, check. Purposeful liberal arts curriculum, check. Study your craft abroad, check! If you are looking for all the above, the Joan Phelps Palladino School of Dance at Dean College truly has it all.

Keep reading... Show less
Thinkstock.

Early in Carrie Imler's 22-year career with Pacific Northwest Ballet, she was excited to be cast in Balanchine's The Four Temperaments. But immediately following dress rehearsal, she was removed from her role in "Melancholic." "My artistic director at the time pulled me aside and said, 'We can't put you out there,' " she remembers. "My weight fluctuated my entire career. Just when I felt like I had figured it out, I would gain it back and have to start all over again." Despite becoming one of PNB's most celebrated principal dancers, Imler never shook the fear of what might happen when a leotard ballet was in the repertoire.

Ballet prides itself on high standards, and the classical ballet physique is not the least of those expectations. Fear of the "fat talk" still lurks in studios, but, as Imler points out, weight is a challenge that many dancers face, while others may struggle with the arches of their feet or turnout. If you are confronted about your weight, know that many talented dancers have been there. Having "the talk" doesn't mean you can't become a professional, but if you take a mindful approach to the conversation, it will show your maturity and ultimately your ability to navigate a career.

Has Something Changed?

If your teacher or director has approached you about your weight, you're likely left feeling emotional, vulnerable and overwhelmed. Once you have a chance to think clearly, ask yourself what factors, like puberty, may be contributing to changes in your body. Nadine Kaslow, resident psychologist at Atlanta Ballet, says, "There is this huge focus on weight and body at a time when even non-dancers are struggling with body issues and everything else that is happening as an adolescent."

External factors often play a role as well. PNB's consulting nutritionist, Peggy Swistak, says that she often sees dancers struggle with weight early in the season as they adjust to living on their own and sharing a kitchen with a roommate. "One may have really bad eating habits and doesn't have to watch her weight at all, and the other is gaining weight. There is a conflict in managing their food together," she says. Ballet Memphis ballet master Brian McSween adds that financial stress can create barriers for eating nutritiously. "The one-dollar piece of pizza costs a lot less than eating organic," he says. "You have to make the best choices possible with what you have." Other changes, like a new schedule, layoffs or even emotional setbacks, will present the need to reevaluate your food habits and exercise routines throughout your career.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Angela Sterling, Courtesy of Pacific Northwest Ballet

Clear your schedule now for Monday, January 29th, 2:45PM (EST)/ 11:45AM (PST). Pacific Northwest Ballet will be live-streaming rehearsal from Kent Stowell's Swan Lake, straight from their Seattle, WA-based studios. To psych us up for their on stage performances February 2nd - 11th, PNB is letting us in on their Act II rehearsal.

From the corps of swans to Odette and Prince Siegfried's pas de deux, and the infamous four swans, this rehearsal is not to be missed. You can sign up now for a live-stream reminder on their site. In the meantime, we'll be brushing up on our Cygnets with this PNB sneak peek.

Summer Study Advice
Thinkstock.

Videos are a great alternative when auditioning in person isn't possible. Here are some general guidelines for making a good impression.

1. Follow directions. Before filming, research what each school you're interested in requires. "It demonstrates your ability to follow instructions, and schools pay attention to that," says Kate Lydon, artistic director of American Ballet Theatre's summer intensives and the ABT Studio Company. "If the guidelines haven't been followed, your video might not be watched the whole way through." You may need to make multiple versions to accommodate different schools.

2. Videos should be no longer than 10 minutes. "Keep it short, simple and direct," advises Philip Neal, dance department chair at The Patel Conservatory and artistic director of Next Generation Ballet. "You have to be sensitive to how much time the director has to sit down and look at it." Barre can be abbreviated, showing only one side per exercise, alternating. Directors will be looking at fundamentals—placement, turnout, leg lines, stability—but don't ignore musicality or movement quality. Make sure music choices match combinations and are correctly synced in the footage.

Keep reading... Show less
Career
Thinkstock

I want to be a professional dancer, but my parents won't listen. They either don't think I can do it (contrary to what my teachers have said) or they won't let me take the necessary steps to become a professional. Please help. —Audrey

Keep reading... Show less
Videos

They say that pigeons mate for life—perhaps that's why these birds naturally symbolize the young lovers in Sir Frederick Ashton's The Two Pigeons. In these two clips from a 1987 performance in Pisa, Alessandra Ferri and Robert LaFosse—then stars with American Ballet Theatre and New York City Ballet, respectively—dance a rapturous pas de deux at the end of Act II. With tiny pricks of her feet and bird-like flaps of her elbows in Part 1, Ferri marks her anguish, thinking she's been abandoned for another woman. Later, both she and LaFosse grow more and more entangled as they reconcile, Ferri dancing with the passionate abandon she's famous for. I love how in Part 2 (0:20), they can't seem to get enough of each other as their necks arch and intertwine. At the end of the ballet, two pigeons fly in to perch symbolically on the chair—er, there's supposed to be two. It looks like one missed its cue at this performance! No matter—Ferri and LaFosse's dancing make it clear that these young lovers are meant to be together for life. Happy #TBT!

Keep reading... Show less

Sponsored

Videos

Sponsored

mailbox

Get Pointe Magazine in your inbox

Sponsored

Win It!