Justin Peck

Justin Peck, the prolific resident choreographer at New York City Ballet, was recently profiled on CBS news. The piece features performance and rehearsal clips from several of his newest creations: 'Rōdē,ō: Four Dance Episodes, Belles-Lettres, Heatscape (choreographed for Miami City Ballet) and scenes from the documentary film Ballet 422.

It’s no secret that as mainstream newspapers have folded or cut costs in recent years, dance criticism has taken a major hit. And while some dancers may have adverse feelings towards critics (especially if they’ve been on the receiving end of a bad review), criticism is nonetheless a vital facet of arts coverage, one that sparks debate and conversation about a performance and draws interest to the company in question.

You've probably heard about the documentary Ballet 422, which is in theaters February 6. The film is directed by Jody Lee Lipes, and chronicles the making of New York City Ballet's 422nd world premiere: Justin Peck's Paz de la Jolla.

If you're a ballet fan, you've probably already noticed the dance films created by fomer Miami City Ballet dancer Ezra Hurwitz.

Choreographer and New York City Ballet soloist Justin Peck must be one of the busiest guys in ballet: Somehow he's dancing full-time while also creating what seems like a never-ending string of imaginative new works. His latest for NYCB, Everywhere We Go, premieres May 8. It marks Peck's second time using music by indie darling (and talented classical composer) Sufjan Stevens, and his first time working collaboratively with Stevens on a score.

The Tribeca Film Festival announced the films of its 2014 World Documentary Competition yesterday. Excitingly, one of the 12 chosen is Ballet 422, the collaboration between Ellen Bar, a former New York City Ballet soloist and the company's director of media projects, and choreographer Justin Peck.

Is ballet's post-Balanchine choreography rut finally over? Roslyn Sulcas, a contributor to Pointe, argues today in The New York Times that it is. She points out that works by Christopher Wheeldon, Alexei Ratmansky and Wayne McGregor offer a completely new way of using the classical vocabulary.