This Week in Dance

Dancers have a love-hate relationship with their pointe shoes. They give us blisters, make our feet throb and don’t last very long—but if anyone tried to take them away, we’d chase them off with a stick.

 

So when former dancer Eliza Gaynor Minden took a closer look at traditional pointe shoe brands and noticed where improvements could be made, she jumped at the chance to develop a high-tech pointe shoe under the label Gaynor Minden.

 

Frozen yogurt shops have taken over the country in the last three years. Believed to be a healthier option than ice cream, fro-yo feels like a free pass to indulge in a sweet treat without the guilt. But when shops are stocked with numerous flavors and a bar of tasty toppings, the “light snack” can easily become a calorie bomb. Here’s how to navigate the fro-yo line without regretting it later.

 

Do:

There’s nothing worse than pulling on your tights and watching a run make its way down your leg. All of the harsh wear we put our tights through on a daily basis can cause them to rip. But there are a few simple steps you can take to help extend their lifespan.

 

  • Read the label: Make sure your tights are made of a sturdy material, like Nylon and Lycra, to ensure a strong hold but also elasticity.
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  • Wear the right size. Tights that are too small are more likely to run when they’re overstretched.
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We love it when ballet pops up in unexpected places. Our excitement levels nearly went through the roof after stumbling across the new Lexus IS advertisement, “Poise." The ad features the stunning Tamara Rojo, artistic director and lead principal dancer of the English National Ballet, leaping, turning and generally rocking out to a new hip-hop track, Step It Up by Kozmeniuk. The only problem? The commercial was produced by Lexus UK and won’t be airing in the States. Still, we love the ad’s message: “A stronger body for greater control.”

Whether you're wilting in the summer heat or steaming under hot theatrical lights, your sweat can wreak havoc on your stage makeup. Make sure your look stays put, no matter how toasty things get.

 

1. Apply primer for an extra layer of sweat-proof hold underneath foundation.

2. Try using tinted moisturizer around the eyes instead of a heavier concealer. That allows the skin to breathe, and the lighter formula is less likely to get caked or clumpy.

What does it take for a dancer to become a dancewear designer? An eye for fashion—and a lot of sewing. Colorado Ballet's Tracy Jones, one of the dancers highlighted in Pointe's "Stars of the Corps" this issue, also owns her own skirt business, Tulips By Tracy. Enter our giveaway to win one of her skirts here.

 

What inspired you to start making skirts?

What you eat when you're injured can change how quickly you get back in the studio. In The Injury Diet: Foods That Heal in Pointe's current issue, Royal Winnipeg Ballet apprentice Emily Docherty shared how her stress fractures didn't get better until she looked at her nutrition. Now she pays close attention to her daily meals.

I've never met a dancer who didn't wish she had the perfect ballet body. But ballet is about making the most of what we do have—and directors understand that. During her interview for Pointe's June/July issue, Ballet BC artistic director Emily Molnar told writer Michael Crabb:

 

A dancer's relationship with her pointe shoes is so intimate, they become not just the tools of her trade, but extensions of her body. But have you ever thought about how they actually get made? This fascinating 2-minute video goes inside the London Freed factory to capture the makers performing their magic. See how they transform the raw materials into something a ballet dancer can depend on.

Ballet dancers spend so many hours in the studio that they often don't get much sun—which makes Memorial Day beach or barbeque time all the more delicious. But watch out: Red, sunburned shoulders and tight leotard straps don't make a happy couple. What can you do when your skin feels like its on fire in class? Try these easy steps suggested by the Mayo Clinic:

1. Take an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory, such as ibuprofen, to relieve the swelling and sensitivity. This is most effective if you do it within the first 24 hours of getting burned.