Suzannah Friscia's blog

In case you need another reason to reach for fruits and vegetables when you're packing your dance bag, new research conducted by the University of Warwick's Medical School found these foods could be just as good for your mental health as they are for your physical health.

You already know about the importance of healthy fats. And using oils in your cooking (in moderation) can be a good way to reap the benefits without overdoing it.

There's one thing we know about dance clothes: After even one class or rehearsal, they get sweaty faster than anything else in your closet. But synthetic materials like polyester, often found in dance and fitness clothing, tend to smell worse (and stink even faster) after exercise than other materials like cotton.

Can money buy happiness? A recent study found that maybe it can—if you're buying an experience. Researchers at Cornell University and University of California, Berkeley, surveyed around 100 college students and more than 2,200 randomly chosen adults to see how they felt while waiting to purchase both material goods and entry to events.

We all know that a cup of coffee can provide a much-needed energy boost during a long day of dance. And several studies from the past few months have reiterated that caffeine can improve athletes' performance in endurance activities. According to research from St. Mary's University in the UK, the thought is that caffeine increases the frequency or size of neural transmissions and helps to suppress pain.

If you've been on social media lately, chances are your feeds have been overloaded with videos of your friends dumping buckets of icy water over their heads. The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge has taken off over the past few weeks, raising money and awareness for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS (commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease). If you are nominated by a friend, you have 24 hours to either complete the challenge or make a $100 donation to The ALS Association. You then challenge other friends to do the same.