Suzannah Friscia's blog

When you're anticipating a high-pressure audition, it's no wonder if your stress levels are heightened. And a little performance anxiety isn't necessarily a bad thing. But a recent study published in Psychoneuroendocrinology found that high stress levels could affect your confidence and decision-making skills in competitive situations.

You're probably not too excited when you look out your studio's window and see dreary, grey weather (especially if you've been affected by this season's blizzards). But it may be a good opportunity to improve your dancing.

Black History Month is right around the corner, and to kick it off, Philadelphia and New York-based company Dance Iquail is holding a free panel discussion on February 2 at 6:30 pm, at NYC's Riverside Theatre.

When you're reaching for an orange in the morning before rehearsal, is it better to grab a piece of whole fruit or drink a glass of juice? The answer you may be used to hearing is fruit, since the juice has less of its beneficial fiber and is higher in sugar.

As much fun as social media can be, you may also be familiar with the unpleasant side effects of constantly comparing yourself to others. Maybe a bunch of your dance friends posted photos from a performance you couldn't make it to, or your classmate got into the summer intensive you wanted and then boasted about it on Facebook.

If you've ever needed to take time off from dance due to injury, then you know how frustrating it can be to rebuild muscle strength after a long period of inactivity. But a recent study published in the Journal of Neurophysiology found that the mind—not just the body—may play a key role in maintaining strength.

This winter, as you juggle busy rehearsal schedules, Nutcracker performances and New Year's plans, it's important to stay health-conscious to fight off those nasty seasonal colds that can slow you down. Try these foods to give your immune system a boost, so you'll head to the studio feeling your best: 

 

After a particularly rough day in the studio, or a long and tiring performance, last-minute holiday shopping might be the furthest thing from your mind. But a recent study in the Journal of Consumer Psychology found that shopping can actually boost your mood. 
The research showed that when people were feeling down, shopping was 40 times more likely to cheer them up than other activities.

When winter hits (especially if you live in the north), the shorter days and chilly temperatures can start to get you down. But there are simple things you can do to cheer yourself up as you go through your day. Try these tips the next time you're longing for spring: