Blogs

I’m now in Las Palmas and writing to you from the pool at the hotel. We had our first free day today!

This past week we’ve been in San Sebastían and Santander. We were in both cities for only two days and they went by so quickly! It was chilly in both but there were incredible beaches. I danced in all of the performances so I was very busy.

Whether you're training in an elite academy, a wealthy suburban conservatory or a studio in the middle of Rio de Janiero's dirt poor favelas, the path to becoming a professional dancer is never easy.

 

Nashville Ballet is adding a new element to their second company this fall: a pre-professional training division for advanced dancers looking to hone their skills. The new program is designed as an entry level into the performing division of Nashville Ballet 2. The cost is $1000 a year for in-depth training, performance opportunities and mentoring from faculty.

Unless you’re a professional dancer with an incredibly grueling schedule, teachers often advise not taking any real time off from ballet, because for every week off, you will need two to get back what you lost. Or so I’ve heard. The general idea, I guess, is that anything that takes time away from working, working, working on your dancing is bad. Having just come back from two weeks away, though, I can say that time off has been hugely beneficial to me as a dancer.

Dayton Ballet in Ohio is launching a new choreography contest. The project will coincide with a music composition contest. Three choreographers will be chosen to create a new work on Dayton Ballet dancers, to a recording of new music by the three chosen composers. Choreographers will have 45 hours with Dayton Ballet dancers of their choice to rehearse, and winners will receive a cash prize. Cincinnati Ballet's Victoria Morgan, Ballet Austin's Stephen Mills and BalletMet's Gerard Charles will judge.

 

To apply, submit a DVD of your work by September 15 to:

 

The Washington Ballet just announced that they will launch a trainee program this fall. Choreographer Carlos Valcarcel will serve as ballet master for the one- to two- year program for pre-preprofessional students ages 17 and older. It's aimed at students who want to fine-tune their technique and gain valuable performance experience before auditioning for companies.

 

New York City Ballet principal Daniel Ulbricht is noted for his high energy and soaring leaps, but for Melissa Barak’s recently premiered Call Me Ben, he took on a role that could have had him falling flat on his face: He not only had to deliver dialogue, but he had to play the gangster Meyer Lansky.

 

 

After seeing New York Theatre Ballet’s “Signatures 10” program on Saturday night, I realized how hard it is to just stand still and hold a pose onstage. These dancers did a great job of it, especially in Ashton’s Capriol Suite, a kind of modern retelling of Renaissance-era court dance.

The following is guest blog by New York City Ballet soloist (and February/March 2010 cover girl) Kathryn Morgan. Stay tuned for more posts from Kathryn!