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Stella Abrera

American Ballet Theatre's Stella Abrera. Photo by Gene Schiavone, Courtesy ABT. 

 

In her book Apollo’s Angels, Jennifer Homans infamously announced that ballet is dying. Though the statement ruffled a lot of feathers in the ballet world, it’s not unreasonable to wonder what direction ballet will take in the 21st century.

Can money buy happiness? A recent study found that maybe it can—if you're buying an experience. Researchers at Cornell University and University of California, Berkeley, surveyed around 100 college students and more than 2,200 randomly chosen adults to see how they felt while waiting to purchase both material goods and entry to events.

The Vaganova Academy has been a powerhouse for supreme technicians and artists for centuries. Iconic names—Balanchine, Nureyev, and Zakharova, to name a few—have sprung from the St. Petersburg school. Vaganova training transforms students to master the most difficult aspects of ballet technique, allowing room to grow into the utmost performers.

 

Misty Copeland's curtain call after her debut (photo courtesy American Ballet Theatre)

 

Misty Copeland will dance her Odette/Odile debut in American Ballet Theatre’s Swan Lake on Wednesday, September 3, during the company’s tour to Brisbane, Australia.

 

Julie Diana in rehearsal for John Cranko's Romeo and Juliet

(photo by Pete Checchia)

 

A quintessential Bournonville piece, Flower Festival in Genzano was originally a one-act ballet choreographed in 1858 for the Royal Danish Ballet. Although the full ballet was inspired by an Alexandre Dumas tale, today only the pas de deux survives. Nevertheless, the charming love story is still apparent in this flirtatious duet, which includes an entrance, two variations and a coda.