Blogs

As if Wendy Whelan’s imminent retirement wasn’t a hard enough pill to swallow, news that Pacific Northwest Ballet’s Carla Körbes will retire in June 2015 makes this an even sadder year for ballet.

Körbes started her career at New York City Ballet, before being hired as a soloist at PNB in 2005. In 2006 she was promoted to principal. Körbes has been lauded for her dancing in Balanchine ballets, and has originated roles in ballets by Peter Martins, Benjamin Millepied, Christopher Wheeldon and Twyla Tharp among others. 

Don Quixote overflows with humor, flirtation and romance. And what better character to gather romance and energy than Cupid—performed in this video by the Bolshoi Ballet’s Evgenia Obraztsova. 

 

There's one thing we know about dance clothes: After even one class or rehearsal, they get sweaty faster than anything else in your closet. But synthetic materials like polyester, often found in dance and fitness clothing, tend to smell worse (and stink even faster) after exercise than other materials like cotton.

Recently retired Miami City Ballet dancer Ezra Hurwitz has found a second calling as a filmmaker. His latest is a peek into the life, or maybe the mind, of New York City Ballet principal Sara Mearns.

For a dancer so famous for having a distinctly Spanish flair, it may seem ironic that it was her success at a Paris competition that led to recognition as a future ballet star. In 1994, Tamara Rojo—now doing double duty as both a principal dancer and artistic director of English National Ballet—received the gold medal and the Special Jury Prize at the Paris International Dance Competition, in which she performed the sensual piece “Arrayan Daraxa.”

 

Stella Abrera

American Ballet Theatre's Stella Abrera. Photo by Gene Schiavone, Courtesy ABT. 

 

In her book Apollo’s Angels, Jennifer Homans infamously announced that ballet is dying. Though the statement ruffled a lot of feathers in the ballet world, it’s not unreasonable to wonder what direction ballet will take in the 21st century.

Can money buy happiness? A recent study found that maybe it can—if you're buying an experience. Researchers at Cornell University and University of California, Berkeley, surveyed around 100 college students and more than 2,200 randomly chosen adults to see how they felt while waiting to purchase both material goods and entry to events.